Live Performance Reviews

Live performance reviews as experienced by all AJR People and a few others who we can entice to volunteer their services to write for our website.

Unusual Gigs Open Eyes on Exciting Musical Collaborations

A week of not-the-usual-fare of musical offerings from bands which consider themselves of ‘mixed’ influences kicked off with the  launch of Mike Rossi’s ‘Journey’ album, The World, rather, seemed to be depicted sonorously and joyfully by all groups that followed their musical themes throughout the week.

Mike Rossi on flute: courtesy Jazz Connection Kaye

Rossi started the live band wagon with local musicians, some who had featured on his chatty album, like trombonist William Haubrich, drummer Kevin Gibson, and pianist bop artist, Andrew Ford along with Rossi’s multiple instruments, saxes and flute.

Lorenzo Blignaut

But it was the performance of young former-Delft Big Band, Lorenzo Blignaut, on flugelhorn that stole the show. His grooming by former Band leader and trumpeter, Ian Smith, has payed off handsomely from teenage years; Blignaut is dedicated and largely self-taught, mentored of course by the greats. Had the lighting effects been better, photographers would have flocked to this popular bakery-cum-jazz venue to catch various band wizards which Slow Life brings in, consistently and faithfully, in order to grow jazz and its various forms in this peninsular community.

Mid-week, Ancient Agents, a poly-rhythmic, multi-percussive group, performed at the vibey Café Roux’s Capetown branch on Shortmarket Street, before their travel to Madagascar for a popular music Festival.

Fredrick Gille, percussion; Schalk Joubert, guitar

Ronan Skillan’s hand-made slide metal didgeridoo expertly accompanied by Swedish cajon box beater and frame drum specialist, Fredrik Gille, brought eerie ancient and earthy sounds that made drinks rattle. Schalk Joubert’s electric bass foundations often echoed Reza Khota’s guitar conversations, making this evening’s event electric, different, and fulfilling.   http://www.alljazzradio.co.za/2017/09/20/primordial-and-polyrhythmic-ancient-agents-is-a-percussion-delight/

Musicians enjoy Café Roux – it’s obvious. Eat some yummy pizza or light dishes first before the show, then relax back to a sound quality experience and dreamy decorum with an appreciative audience. Although Ancient Agents musicians focus on ‘jazz’, their improvisations cut across ancestral and traditional folk lines that are always pleasing. As is the venue!  Oh, and yes, the venue introduces the band, and softly reminds the patrons to keep chatting volumes low in order to appreciate the musical offerings. Woe to the many other venues who simply don’t care about the music!

By Friday, another Slow Life-sponsored group hit town:  SULP* (Swiss Urban Landler Passion) intrigued music students and fans at a College of Music concert with their enigmatic sounds that draw out folk life in an increasingly urbanizing Switzerland, yet stay true to tradition, the ‘Landler’ folk music. Featuring the concertina instrument, with its diatonic buttons on one side, and chromatic buttons on the other side, and a 4 metre long ‘Alp Horn’ blown, or rather breath-caressed like a didgeridoo with a French horn twist, and several other more ‘modern’ instruments, like the saxophone and double bass, SULP swung into rapturous waltzes and polka moods, reminiscent of music played in the popular film, ‘Sound of Music’.  The alpine terrain comes to life, as did this recital hall with students looking for the familiar.  Homegrown South Africans, Trumpeter Marcus Wyatt, and guitarist Derek Gripper added their individual mixes of African and a bit of Nordic influences.  As SULP says, “Swiss folk music, in its contemporary form, did not emerge in the countryside but was invented by industrial workers in the fast growing urban centers re-imagining their rural origins in the rapidly changing world.”

SULP play at 4 other venues this weekend.

*Simon Dettwiler (conertina), Matthias Gubler (saxophone) and Hannes Fankhauser (Alp Horn, double bass)

 

 

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Tabla rock and Indian jazz fusion by AVATAAR hits Kalk Bay’s Olympia Bakery

They looked oddly rested after 25 flight hours, landing in Cape Town a few hours before their sound check for the evening’s concert at Kalk Bay’s popular Olympia Bakery-turned-jazz –club-at-night.  The Toronto-based AVATAAR sextet arrived for their first African performance, which should not be their last.

Coming from ethnically seasoned backgrounds, including southern India and Italy, these Canadians presented a rare treat of sounds for this peninsula community, a mix of tabla-inspired blues cooked with a sometimes acid-rock guitar groove, then a Coltrane-influenced alto sax complemented  with Indian scat of vocalist, Suba Sankaran.

Sundar Viswanathan: courtesy ratspace

Their jazz fused improvisation with varieties of world sonic motifs, playing off the compositions of sax/flute band leader, Sundar Viswanathan’s debut album, Petal (2015).  Named for flowers that show their beautiful bloom for a short time, then disappear; thus the ephemeral nature of existence,  impermanence.

The generous 100 minute performance was electric – a sitar-sounding guitarist, Michael Occhipinti who carries Sicilian accents of heritage wedded so perfectly with the raga nuances provided by Ravi Naimpally’s tabla and Haiku speaking bassist, George Koller. While one often associates Indian classical music with spirituality, the divine touch heard on this night felt more like a sitar-rock meeting contemporary jazz styles with cross-overs into funk and melodic ballads.  These eclectic band members each boast musical accolades and awards across the Canadian music spectrum, and deservedly, needed to visit the finest of South Africa’s jazz traditions coincidentally during Heritage celebrations.  Or was it a coincidence?  Their three-city tour this week (September 22-30, 2018) takes them to other heritage sites of Durban and Pretoria, besides Capetown.

Ravi Naimpally

Befittingly, talking about ‘heritage’, AVATAAR’s performance cleverly highlighted some of the immigrant musical backgrounds of the musicians, thanks to Viswanathan’s Tamil influences. Such compositions from Petal include reference to South Asian contexts like tsunamis in “Banda Aceh” with staccato taka taka vocals of Naimpally, or storms in “Monsoon”.  Long influenced by Brazil’s Antonio Carlos Jobim, Viswanathan infuses Brazilian rhythms for effect, and has even mastered Portugese in order to explore wider cultural circles.

But unlike the ending song on the album, “Petal (emphemerata)” with spoken word philosophies about the purpose of existence supported by one’s spirituality, AVATAAR chose to honour a South African jazz legend’s composition, Abdullah Ibrahim’s “Mannenberg”.  What ensued was a frolicking jazz rock heightened by tabla and drums as the familiar song swung through its cadences and rhythms in true South African style.  Now that was a highlight of the evening!      https://www.facebook.com/neil.frye.71/videos/10156676818712152/

Their South African tour was made possible by Canada’s Council for the Arts and Paul Bothner music providing the baseline instruments. Event manager Paul Kahanowitz had met Viswanathan a year ago, and managed to pull this group to our shores.  Applause to all.

Further information from Sundar Viswanathan at sundar@sundarmusic.com;  +1-416 994 0758

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Smooth jazzy fusion from Ladies’ Heels Over Head by Carol Martin

Capetown-Durban play Gugs: ISupportDoYou

Spirit lifting, head turning, chuckles and smiles….. are utterances from the lively audiences exposed to the Durban-ladies-meet-Capetown-ladies, under the band name of “Heels Over Head”, a Durban-based all-female jazz pop band that started in 2008. And uplifting they were as they nestled us inside Gugulethu’s Kwa Sec house with a roaring fire and hard-to-find independent wines on sale. Three Durban gals linked up with Capetownians Nobuhle Ashanti Mazinyane on piano and keys,  Tracey Johannes on bass guitar, and guitarist Arianna Carini who started with the Durban group and is presently studying classical Flamenco at the University of Capetown’s School of Music.

Guitarist Arianna Carini

HOH’s tour through SA Concerts from their Durban base is a collaboration seeking to mentor and develop the talents of other female jazz and blues artists. This echos the band members’ own upbringings in musical families and youth orchestras.

 

Bassist Tracey Yohannes

Theirs is a special sound: funky blues with Carini’s killer guitar which adds the pop/rock feel; vocalist and HOH founder Thulile Zama, throws soulful ballads with a vocal control that speaks to ten years plus experience leading the Durban band.

Drummer Rebecca Doty

Vocalist-Founder Thulile Zama

Drummer Rebekah Doty. offers subtle rhythms that don’t overpower; Doty has also served in a military band before resuming her HOH link. The youngest member of this collaboration, Mazinyane’s keys are gentle and melodic. Her hands have matured; she plays with ease.

HOH Could It Be (2010)

Their albums also feature pianists Taryn Kasaval and Lindi Ngonelo, bassist Tebogo Sedumedi, and a hot guitarist, Chillie, who ensures the flame endures in the band’s sonic fusion.  Their first album in 2010, Could It Be, contains haunting African jazzics, such as ‘Pata Pata, with very danceable rhythms, melting smooth jazz as in ‘Betrayed’, the lively soul pop of the album’s title, ‘Could It Be’, and the upbeat drum ‘n bass funk remix of ‘Girlfriend’. This album exudes emotion, purpose, and message, all which has spiraled these ‘girls’ into a limelight of recognition.

Besides performing in various festivals, like Moshito, and at the 2017 Essence Festival in New
Orleans, USA, the group was nominated in 2011 for MTN SAMA AWARDS in the Contemporary Jazz category.

Sondela (2013)

Their 2013 album, Sondela, presents a slower groove through the seasoned vocals of the musicians entwined in soft ballad harmonies, as in the popular ‘Ntilo Ntilo’ and in ‘Ngiyak’ Phica Phica’. Slow smooth jazz in a blues style around love themes, with the occasional mood setting of a trumpet, characterises this album quite differently to the 2010 album. If I had to choose between the two, Could It Be explains why the group was SAMA nominated in 2011.

Vocalist and founder, Thulile Zama, explains how HOH members managed to stay together for 10 years: “Few bands have survived over the years. We have worked for many years to create opportunities for ourselves. It has been a great experience, both enriching and humbling, and we will continue to offer platforms for female musicians.”

Drummer Rebekah Doty adds: “We want to be an example to other female musicians and show them that everything is possible. We have performed for so many different audiences throughout the years. Still being together after 10 years is a great motivation to keep the band going.”

The style of the Heels Over Head gals, both on and off the stage, reveals how these well-dressed ladies approach their art seriously but with glee and pizzaz, seeking to musically entertain and make us all feel good….and perhaps ready for more wine and chats! See the following links:

Website: www.heelsoverheadband.com
You Tube: www.youtube.com/isupportdoyou
Facebook: www.facebook.com/heelsoverhead
Instagram: www.instagram.com/heelsoverheadband

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Keenan Ahrends Quintet sprouts musical narratives at the recent CTIJFestival

Capetownian guitarist, Keenan Ahrends, is exuding maturity and clarity in his musical journey by honestly divulging his experiences with the joys and mistrusts in life.

To a question put to him during the press conference at Capetown’s recent International Jazz Festival, the youthful Ahrends, explains how and why he narrates his stories musically:

“Music has emotions, sometimes through words and pictures. I use tools of texture, emotion, and colour so that my sounds come naturally, maybe not always consciously. Through improvisation, you can allow yourself to play that emotion.”

Simply put, Ahrends seems to know where and how he’s headed with his craft, a delightful mix of home-grown Cape ghoema, grungy blues rock, free jazz, and bits of traditional South African music. A graduate of the University of Capetown’s College of Music, Ahrends has immersed himself in musical open markets for absorbing jazz expressions, particularly from Norway where he studied at its Academy of Music and collaborated with those artists, and from parts of South Africa through his peer friendships.

Keenan Ahrends-Courtesy Gregory Franz

When asked what influences have helped him to move jazz boundaries, his quaint reply humbly referred to those legends who have pushed the music forward, and the new experimental sounds emerging from ‘world’ influences, like trumpeter Christian Scott’s guitarist, Matthew Stevens, whose voicings led to “Scott’s Move” on Ahrends’ album. Then, there are also his peers:

“I don’t feel I have to break a barrier or produce a completely different sound, but to respect and admire what my peers are composing. Along with the old, and the new, my peers help me to have a goal in mind, a level to reach, such as a new audience to reach, and unconsciously try to cross genres . Yah, the new, the old, and my peers.”

Ahrends clearly admits that it is connecting and playing with his friends that satisfies him the most because these are the few very good players that influence him.

Another journalist question this: But doesn’t this run the danger of producing too much of the same sound if you only play with your friends? Ahrends says not really, only if a new guy comes along and tries to convince the group about styling and interpretation, and you silently comply.

A thoughtful question was posed by another: In the 1950s and 60s, there was a collective of jazz artists looking after each other with a common expression of long sought-out freedom. Now, there tends to be a lot of individualism with musicians leading bands and jamming together, and members changing roles. So, is there still a space for integrating that kind of jazz approach of collectivism and sharing?

“I think we do, in a different way today. We have a friendship amongst peers where we can interact and, as a band leader, invite others to play with me. I enjoy that; a lot of playing in each other’s projects, with a collective drive to push the music forward. For instance, the initial composer would invite other players to contribute to the writing process. So, yes, I feel that because we have strong bonds with each other, we’re not that separated. I’m not clear on how get a collective consciousness per se, but we’re all individually going in the same way. “

While studying in Norway in 2009, Ahrends suffered a culture shock, but got over it.

“We from South Africa come with our jazz language and B-Pop lines, but the improvisation class was like digging into sound and texture and free improvisation and harmony. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed this free improvisation, of making something complex simple. But I thought at times, ‘what is going on here?’ I enjoyed it.”

The Album, released in 2017, narrates Ahrends’ experiences with a reflective and honest approach. He has chosen his quintet members well, each providing their unique twist to his stories. Nicholas Williams’ piano brings a melodic tenderness to ‘Silent Mistrust’, a composition that echos Ahrends’ past disappointments. “This song conveys how I felt when my trust was broken ; I endured it, first, silently, then loudly. Through that composition, I could reflect, because there was something inside me; I had to be tender with myself.” Through his guitar improvisation, he could “tear things apart”.

Romy Brauteseth-courtesy Mikhaela Faye Kruger

Double bassist, Romy Brauteseth, adds reflective texture on her solos in “Stories Behind Expressions” and “Inevitability”. The breathy wails of Sisonke Xonti’s tenor sax replicate maskandi sounds unique to South Africa. Further textures and moods are layered by drummer Sphelelo Mazibuko as in “Brotherhood” and the energetic “Untitled in 5”.  The band is tight;  they know each other very well.

Nicholas Williams – piano

But it’s the guitar that carries the story line: “All” swings from a contemplative ballad into an acid rock style which screams help, giving a sense of urgency, but then dips into resolve at the end. A moving piece. “Untitled in 5” has mixed rhythms reminiscent of South African ancestral Khoisan dance with an effective and tight duo between guitar and sax only interrupted with a robust Mazibuko drum solo. Ahrends wrote this piece while camping with his family, but couldn’t find a suitable title. Same for “Untitled in 3”.

Sphelelo Mazibuko – drums

“It comes from listening to traditional South African jazz music . The chordal placement parts go into a 6/8 time with a harmonically South African tonality. I just liked the sound of ‘untitled in’!!”

Ahrends expresses emotional whirlwinds from life experiences, and shakes them off in “Here We Go Again”, a careful slow ballad that builds a story in a pure, soulful way. Then the song erupts; the energetic drum and the emphatic grungy guitar pronounce that life IS hard – but get over it. This well-constructed song sighs in desperation, but with a beauty and release that lingers.

Grungy rock marks these stories; Ahrends stylistically switches from grunge to subtle South African sounds as in “Past” and “Stories Behind Expressions”. This is why ‘Narrative’ is listenable and reflectively memorable.

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Classical Indian sitarist Niladri Kumar explores  musical boundaries

'Path Bender' sitarist Niladri Kumar

‘Path Bender’ sitarist Niladri Kumar

The Indian classical sitar comes to Capetown’s Baxter Theater 29 July and to Johannesburg’s Lyric Theater on 30 July straight from Niladri Kumar’s home of Mumbai, India. These ‘Raga Ecstasy’ concerts are possible thanks to Inner Circle Entertainment which produces  Indian Classical Music concerts in South Africa. As one of India’s premier classical sitarists, Kumar is not so much eager to collect sitars or sit on their glory, but to highlight how the instrument can benefit others.

Training orphan girls to play sitar

Training orphan girls to play sitar

Coming from a prestigious musical family of means, his heart seemed always in tune with those less fortunate.  During the International Year of the Girl Child in 2013, he and his team trained orphan girls to play sitar and to perform.       He auctioned off a nearly 100-year old sitar he grew up with in order to raise funds for underprivileged musical prodigies in his midst.

PHOTO  With grandfather & father

Playing sitar from age 4, under the tutelage of his father (who was also a disciple of the famous sitarist, Ravi Shankar), Kumar remained loyal to his five-generations family history of sitar playing, while feeling his contemporary world demanding flexibility and change.  Kumar, thus, created the ‘zitar’, an electronic version of the traditional sitar.

Kumar playing with grandfather and father

Kumar playing with grandfather and father

 

“The scope of an instrument is never decided by the music.” Kumar refers to the sitar’s range of use in Hindi film music. Musicians’ sensibilities change, thus affecting how the instrument complements particular themes.   The ‘Z’ in zitar connotes the zany, edginess.  Hence, the electronic sitar evolves to a five string fusion of Indian classical with a contemporary international flavour.  Some traditionalists queried this upstart. But these how-dare-you sentiments were gradually subterfuged by the encroaching young global fusions of sounds, rhythms, and message.

While respecting tradition, Kumar admits that Indian classical music ‘needs a boost’.  What awaits our raga listening ear on 29 July at the Baxter Concert Hall promises to be awe-inspiring and highly entertaining musical feast.

Kumar with John McLaughlin, Zakir Hussain & Eric Harland

Kumar with John McLaughlin, Zakir Hussain & Eric Harland

* * * * * *

Ronan-Feature1

This writer (CM) and tabla/dirigidoo musician Ronan Skillen (RS) from Capetown had an awesome opportunity to Skype chat with Kumar, prior to his travels to South Africa end of this month.  Skillen provided an ideal complement to our discussions since he specializes in various ethnic percussion instruments,   and has, himself, studied in India under the tutelage of a notable tabla musician.  Kumar will be performing with the renowned tabla player, Vijay Ghate, who is widely acknowledged for his forays into fusion with well-known artists including the Jethro Tull band, George Duke, Al Jarreau , and Ravi Coltrane.  Ghate has lectured at Codarts University of Arts at Rotterdam as well as formed a trust called Taalchakra, which provides a platform to young and upcoming artists and supports for musicians in financial need.

………

Kumar says he will just be playing the sitar in his South African concerts,  and will explore with the audiences the world of Indian classical raga melodies and different rhythmic time signatures, or Talas.

CM:  Here in South Africa, we hear lots of other types of music.  Do you fuse your classical with other forms of music?

NK;  Yes, we explore these fusions, particularly in Mumbai which supports musicians collaborating with jazz and other kinds of non-Indian music.  This has been going on for at least 60 years now.  Ever since I was a teenager, I’ve played in unfamiliar territory of art other than the comfort of just having the tabla.  So it’s no longer ‘unique’ to explore these other sounds and rhythms.

CM:  OK, then maybe we’ll hear a little bit of jazz from you… (laughter).

NK:  The thing is, I don’t know jazz music.  I’ll explain with this short story.   I was preparing for an English essay exam and the preparation I did was to write an essay on the river.  The river is like classical music for me.    But at the exam, I was supposed to write about the elephant.  I know what the contours of the elephant looks like, what it eats, and what it does.  So I explained what the elephant looks like and how I walked it in the forest while it munches on the vegetation.  Then the elephant arrives at the river to drink, it falls into the river.  Then, I write the essay about the river which is what I prepared for!  So that’s how I play jazz, and that’s how jazz musicians play classical music.  So if you’re expecting jazz music from me, you’re in the wrong place!!  We tend to play what we know most about!

CM:  (laughter)  I’ll hand you over to Ronan whose home wifi username is – guess what?  ‘Elephant’!

NK:  Oh, my goodness!!

RK:  You know, it’s so bizarre! That story you just told.  I was just re-watching  the making of the  “Industrial Zen” album which features guitarist John McLaughlin and he told that same story on that DVD.  You had told it to him.  That’s so funny.

NK:  Because people tend to ask the same question….about playing jazz….. (laughter).

RK:  That’s a good answer because most people know that Indian classical music is improvised …

NK:  I think improvisation is more in the thought process, but not necessarily in the music, because it comes from so many different cultures and in that sense, it can only smell and feel different in different parts of the world.  But at the same time, it’s a valid question and a good answer, so we still have to deal with those 7 notes in our universe. And imagine that every emotion needs to be expressed through those 7 notes.  This narrowed down connection with musicians all over the world is amazing.  I don’t think any other trade can do that, to pinpoint such a connection.

RK:  You’re right. Because it’s like having guidelines – within that context (7 key notes) you’ve got to express what you want to say.  And it’s amazing.  You take the sitar, with its 19 strings, but you’re only really playing one string.  You’re exploring a contemporary version of something very ancient.  It’s also interesting how you bring in chordal progressions – wit those long reaches  …..  and I can see on the fretboard that you’re struggling to get them!

NK:  Yes, those chords.  In 1995, I was playing a concert in Mumbai at a very traditional music place.  All the traditional greats have performed there, even my father.  I was in my early 20’s and that was the first time I played chords.  The next day, a big article made the newspaper saying how sacrilegious it was for me to play chords because I had come from a great musical tradition of my father, so much more was expected of me.  This got me thinking because I had played a 2 ½ hour concert; yet, the chords had lasted not more than 30 – 45 seconds.  The writer’s critique of this small percentage of the concert took up over half the article!  So maybe I should increase the chord playing time in order to get an important front-page article from my concerts! (laughter)

This is our Indian music – we have to go through all these stages of exploring sounds and techniques on our instruments to appeal to the younger generation.  So, the journey of exploring boundaries has to continue, even in traditional music.

CM:  About that exploring boundaries….. Some people say that the sitar is always so romantic and so sad at the same time.  How do you take this sadness out of the sitar sound?

NK:  You don’t have to.  Why would you take an emotion away?  Our music revolves around the nine emotions which we call ‘navaras’.   Melancholy or sadness is one of these moods, or emotions, the feeling of having lost something, or missed out on whatever.  This is very much part of our musical evolution.  We are fortunate to be able to explore these diverse emotions, from happiness to actually making someone cry in sadness.  It’s wonderful .  Not many instruments have that range.

It also depends on the musician, which areas he wants to explore that day, whether the song is to be happy, or sad.  This is essential.  I see young people listening to music and dancing to it, finding it very groovy, and letting their hair down.  What about having a dance within you?  Without having to actually get onto the dance floor?  That dance within needs to have a range of emotions.

CM:  That brings me to another point.  Given your various generations of listeners in India, which groups tend to like your music, and which groups question what you’re doing with your contemporary music?

NK:  The senior groups tend to question, like your teachers as they technically know more and will always question you.  On the other hand, if the listener doesn’t question why I’m playing in such a way, then that listener is stagnant and thinks you’re not moving anything.  If someone in a comfort zone asks why, that means you have shifted something which is not the usual.  If that shift doesn’t happen in any form of music, then it’s not music any more.

CM:  Well, I look forward to hearing your ‘shift’ at your concert…….

NK:  Please don’t get stuck on the ‘shift’, because the usual is also good enough! (laughter)

RK:  Can I say you’re from a younger generation?

NK:  You’re very kind, Ronan.  I’m in my early 40’s.

RK:  Just listening to why you do what you do, I feel that in this modern world, to try to keep such a culturally diverse form of music alive, like with classical Indian music, is a difficult thing. I’ve been exposed to a lot of this music, and I love it, as abstract and as difficult as it can be to listen to …. You can have an interpretation of whichever raga you hear one night, and the next night you can hear the same raga performed by somebody else, and it’s completely different.

NK:  Exactly

RK:  …and in terms of India as a country with a culture so intact…. I haven’t seen it anywhere else in the world where music is being taken to such a level.

NK:  It’s also because such music has evolved over thousands of years …..

RK:  What I’m saying is it’s great to see someone as enlightened as you, taking from all the different ways and walks of life, and putting it into something that is currently contemporary music.

NK:  The light switched on my head from my musical family. (laughter)

RK:  Sometimes, I have also found how Indian classical music can be quite one-sided and closed off as well where you don’t access the tradition …. This is how it’s done, and this is the tradition…period.

NK::  But I would consider this necessary, where some form simply doesn’t change.  This is essential if you have to have your base in some form of tradition.

RS:  ….yes, to preserve it.  But what I’m getting at is the question Carol raised about the younger generation, that the more you’re able to draw upon the lineage and respect for the teachers and all who have distilled the music into what you know, and if you’re able to portray it in such a way that it’s going to reach everyone, and specifically the younger generation, that’s the key.  In today’s world, like you were saying, that dance inside….instead of the quick fix…  And listening to how you play and operate, in an interactive way on stage, I think you’re on that track.  It’s great!

NK:  I don’t do things which I don’t believe in.    The problem lies when you try to form someone upon somebody else’s success. That’s where the passion and commitment  get nullified.  You can’t copy.   Everyone has to have their own path. The only thing about Indian classical music is that sometimes it can become a bit preachy, that you’re telling the audience that this is the tradition, and this is how you do it, this way or the highway!  But I think rather than become preachy, let this music become a form for communicating with the audience.

CM:  You’ve given us a lot of food for thought, Niladri, and we thank you very much….

NK:  Oh, I’m so sorry about that!  Everybody’s on a diet nowadays!

CM:  We wish you could be longer with us as we would take you to a cave for recordings.  This is what Ronan and two other colleagues did recently, and recorded an album in a cave in their ‘Cave Project’.

NK:  Incredible.  You’ve got certain acoustic enhancements right there, like delays, all free of cost!  I’ve always wanted to play a concert in a church, and did so in a chapel in France.   The acoustics are incredible,  you have to alter your playing.  The sustain is so much longer and so different.

CM:  Well, we have lots of churches here, so you may want to change your schedule a bit!  And I also look forward to crying a lot at your Baxter concert!

NK:  Oh Oh!  (laughter)  But that’s how a musician’s schedule is.  Nobody want to keep us so we’re shoved onto the first available flight back home!

This interview will broadcast LIVE on www.alljazzradio.co.za  pm Friday, 21 July 2017, at 9pm  Central African Time, and repeats on Sunday 23 July at 5am CAT and on Monday 24 July at 1pm  CAT.

Computicket:  tickets for Niladri Kumar and Vijay Ghate concert are available for 29 July at the Baxter in Capetown and on 30 July in Johannesburg.

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LISTENING VENUES SUPPORT LIVE MUSIC ARTS- Rootspring at Novalis Ubuntu Institute, Wynberg, Capetown

Rootspring presented at Novalis Ubuntu Institute on 8 July, 2017, a dramatic full moon concert of serenity featuring singer Indwe on traditional Xhosa- bow, with an exciting percussion duo, ‘Intone’ made up of tabla and dirigidoo player, Ronan Skillen, and James van Minnen on skin and box drums and other percussion.

Intimate staging at Novalis Ubuntu Institute

Intimate staging at Novalis Ubuntu Institute

Singer Indwe

                        Singer Indwe in cave

Van Minnen’s thesis is that lower-frequency instruments producing sounds of earth and nature are soothing to babies in utero and outside the womb, and to pregnant women.

The two gentlemen came together recently to revive their 17-year history exploring similar soundscape interests:  van Minnen invited Skillen to come and play in a coastal cave north of Capetown. Not surprisingly, given the spiritual yin-yang balance of these two men, their musical purpose was to honour motherhood and femininity.

Intone percussion instruments  Intone percussion instruments

Ronan Skillan & dirigidoo in cave

   Skillen exploring dirigidoo sounds in cave

Supported by neurological research, he says such sounds would favourably activate the baby’s brain waves with pleasant resonance from the cave space and acoustic instruments. The two-CD album, called The Cave Project: Meditations and Lullabies, was thus recorded over a three-day period in this found cave. Fascinating and explicit photos and videos on the making of this unusual sound project are worth digesting, at http://rootspring.co.za/the-cave-project-lullabies-meditations/

3-in-a-cave

                              3-in-a-cave

The music is about human connections, meditatively explored from the roots of our being. The Novalis evening was choreographed with standing candles lighting the prepared round stage in the middle of this oval interior. The audience seating completed this roundness. The building’s dome facilitated the excellent acoustic sounds from voice, bow, and percussion instruments with minimal amplification. To enable a cave decorum, pre-recorded sounds from inside the cave – birds chirping, bats flying, water rustling – accompanied the live performance, creating an extraordinary ambiance of serenity.

The Institute is known as being a quiet, meditative space for courses and workshops of a developmental nature, hosted by various NGOs and community groups. This writer has enjoyed many full-moon evening meditations in this spiritually uplifting space. This full moon evening on 9 July was nothing short of magical.

James van Minnen & Ronan Skillan outside their cave

James van Minnen & Ronan Skillen outside their cave

Rootspring Conscious Music is the brain-child of its Producer, the well-known musician, Jonny Blundell, whose music label promotes ‘world music’ by local South African musicians with ethnic bents. He was drawn to The Cave Project because “it features musicians playing instruments that are generally traditional ethnic instruments. It also appealed to us because of the unusual combination of musicians and certainly because of the unusual location! Recording in a cave was a first for us.”

The Cave Project: Meditations & Lullabies is available from www.rootspring.co.za

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Tango Improvised with Afro-Cuban: a Fusion Feast with Escalandrum of Argentina

The recent Capetown International Jazz Festival (CTIJF) was given a special treat – a resurrection of grandmaster Astor Piazolla’s ‘New Tango’ with a special twist by grandson Daniel ‘Pipi’ Piazolla who loves the Afro-Caribbean claves rhythms set to a Tango mood.

Daniel 'Pipi' Piazolla, drummer

Daniel ‘Pipi’ Piazolla, drummer

Grandfather Astor Piazolla has been considered as Argentina’s most celebrated composer and bandoneonist of the ‘New Tango’ which did not include a singer, but wedded improvisational jazz and classical music together.  Two generations later, grandson Daniel ‘Pipi’  Piazolla and his merry Escalandrum sextet band have put aside the traditional bandoneon and violin of former tango years, and added singer, Elena Roger, and a three-horn section plus drum kit.

Escalandrum at CTIJF 2017

         Escalandrum 

Their intention is to promote the sounds of their city, Buenos Aires, which reigns with the tango, but continue to fuse the delightful urban swing with some complicated improvisation techniques, particularly using the sonorous, multi-ranged bass clarinet, a rarity in contemporary jazz.  Pipi says his grandfather hated the dancing that went with his-day tango.  “People should listen, not dance, to tango,” Pipi agrees.

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They love their city of Buenos Aires as well as sharks.  “Escalandrún” is the Argentinian name for a sand shark, the favourite marine animal of the Piazolla family who fish sharks.  One song performed at the Jazz Festival was composed by drummer Pipi to honour sharks.  It was a stunningly haunting piece with the bass clarinet making sonic images of whale and dolphin calls, low rumbles conveying feelings of dark sea depths, and other primordial sounds, even imitating the dirigidoo.

Escalandrum performing at CTIJF 2017

Escalandrum performing at CTIJF 2017

Their performance at CTIJF this year was their first on African soil.  ‘Pipi’ felt there were so many similarities between African rhythms and the tango that they hope to continue more collaborations as Escalandrum perfects their own new age tango improvisations.

Escalandrum at CTIJF 2017 Media Conference

Escalandrum at CTIJF 2017 Media Conference

During my interview with the sextet of large and well-built men, Pipi explained that in 2001, when a crisis in Argentina caused many to leave the country, he and his merry men stayed (his musical buddies formed Escalandrum in 1999);  they felt the pressure to change the folkloric tango and offer uplifting music for their depressed fellow citizens.  Hence, an emphasis on the milonga 5/4 odd meter beats.  “We were more socially inspired than political because the country wasn’t stable. We searched in ourselves; our ages influenced us:  when young we just wanted to play bebop, but as we grew older the mind opened up to other inspiring rhythms.  Everybody was running away, but we wanted to stay here.”

We talked about why Escalandrum was fusing more with Afro-Cuban music.  “The Latin milongas go well with our own folkloric traditions in Argentina:  the chacarera and malambo rhythms in 6/8, the sambo in ¾, and as jazz musicians, we love rhythms.”  Then, why did they move away from the accordion?  “The bandoneon is more difficult to adapt to the improvisational jazz approach which we want to move forward.  In Argentina and particularly in Buenos Aires, we are a melting pot of cultures so we don’t stick to one traditional sound, but branch out and absorb others which have influenced us – like African, North American, and Cuban music.  The bandoneon has actually saved our music, and made it original, but there is other original music we can continue to produce. “

And what was that about Mozart, I asked?  “A festival producer wanted us to bring our interpretation of Mozart in Piazolla form to a festival, as an art form.  Those people interested in classical music were willing to let us be free with our presentations, which is good.   We brought on one of our best classical musicians who also was our teacher and also taught my grandfather, and we performed with only two microphones – very stereophonic.  It was one recording with no mixing, and is available.  It was quite a challenge, however, to play Mozart and Piazolla together!

CD 'Piazolla plays Piazolla' Album Cover

CD ‘Piazolla plays Piazolla’ Album Cover

Escalandrum’s Latin Grammy-winning album, “Piazolla Plays Piazolla”, explains so eloquently and sonorously the dimensions and styles which their contemporary music is using.  Produced in 2011, the album is excitingly polyrhythmic, thanks to the many clave beats grounded in Afro-Cuban/Caribbean varieties.  Each band member has composed songs and infused his own sounds to make this album multi-spirited and innovative.

‘Tanguedia  1” sounds like an angry retort against the flimsy tango dancing people, unsupported by Escalandrum’s style of tango.   “Fuga 9” implants a classical flare which contorts into horn-pronounced  resolution,  followed by a boppish piano trio which seeks to calm down the protesting horns.  This is a well improvised piece, full of jazzic twists that return to the fundamental Piazolla beat.

“Romance del Diablo” starts with low key bass clarinet paired with melodic saxes morphing into a surprising ballad honouring the devil.  Here, the horns spell diabolic images romancing themselves, a winner!

It’s this fusion of the at-times cacophonic improvisation (as in ‘Buenos Aires Hora Cero’), mellow ballad moods, and standard jazz bop, which permits the re-entry of that notorious tango rhythm into the sonicsphere,  that keeps one’s ears eagerly plugged to the band’s conversations.  “Adios Nonino” does this nicely, resolving into a beautiful, almost mournful, song.

One learns the wide range of the bass clarinet, so expertly played by Martin Pantyrer,  which successfully establishes frameworks for both mood and message.

Martin Pantyrer plays bass clarinet & tenor saxophone

Martin Pantyrer plays bass clarinet & tenor saxophone

The beats keep changing between 5-4 time, then the clave 3-2 time, and so on, but the fundamental 4/4 time sounds come from Pipi’s clave, that five-stroke pattern that is at the structural core of many Afro-Cuban rhythms. The album ends with a stunning drum solo by Pipi in ‘Libertango’ that fuses, again, with the basic tango sound and seems to heal and free up the spirit.

Escalandrum sextet

Escalandrum sextet

Pipi explains what influences him:  “The Uruguayan–African influences have molded the Milongo and  malambo mixtures which are heard, such as the  5/4 time. Also, every night I watch YouTube music videos to find something new and interesting. Then in the morning, I try to practice what I heard and explore different sounds.”  Pianist Nicholas Guerschberg says he tries to find new music and ideas and styles so he can play different originals.  The latest project is to combine Mozart with our tango!”  Escalandrum’s latest album,  “SesionesION:Obras de Mozart y Ginastera”, recorded in mid-2016, was released January 4, 2017.

 

'SesionesION' Album Cover

‘SesionesION’ Album Cover

They do sound like friends who have hung out together since youth, who decided to put their talents together into a band in 1999.  Escalandrum has traveled extensively since, winning awards as they merge the Argentinian rhythmic styles more and more with the Afro-Caribbean Latin influences.  Hence, sounds of conga, son, mambo, and salsa spice up their forward-sounding tango and other globally-influenced rhythms.  This is rhythmic excitement at its best!

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Jazz – Wine – Food – Comedy: a Soul Cleansing

Love wine?  Love it more:  pair it with that food for the soul – jazz – complemented with a good dose of belly-shaking comedy, all which works up the appetite for that 3-course delectable meal from award-winning chefs where different wines are paired with the different dishes on offer.

12289647_923882977704178_750311950479883073_nComedian Lindi & Hassan'adas

MmWHaaaa!  Now that’s an afternoon to follow the annual Capetown International Jazz Festival as festive spirits literally spilled over into Sunday jazz brunches, wine tastings, and the like.

It’s not just about that wine bottle, or that particular jazz band, or about that colourful starter at table.  It’s about experiencing, moving the culinary and emotional juices to realize what wholesome healing can take place and what wonderful memories can endure into the week ahead.

Wines

Sip by Sip does just that by creating opportunities for marketing South Africa’s finest wines and addressing the ‘new age’ needs of various wine aficionados who wish to combine taste experiences.  Not just good taste in the culinary, but in music and entertainment.  “A voyage to enchanting places, and encounter with remarkable people, and the delight of good food and cultural experiences,” is Sip by Sip’s visionary purpose, and delightful it is.

Da Capo Wine Estate

Da Capo Wine Estate

Thanks to Sip by Sip’s event, “Sunday in the Vines”, I was honoured the experience of imbibing wines from Italian cultivars with my 3-course meal at the Da Capo wine estate, high up in the Hottentot Holland mountains of Sir Lowry’s Pass in Somerset West, Western Cape.  This event ‘paired’ with the annual Jazz Festival, particularly for those who couldn’t attend the festival but could benefit from one of Capetown’s finest jazz band, on this day being “Hassan’adas”, a vibrant combination of Mozambiquan and South African musicians of the highest quality. Da Capo is owned and run by the Bottega family of Italian descent, hence the marketing of fine Italian wines of the Idiom brand.

Views around winery

After winding up through some 4 kilometres of mountain scenery on a tarred road, one arrives at the estate’s restaurant which boasts almost 360 degrees of luscious mountain and sea views. Da Capo is the most southern winery in the Western Cape, with high exposures to wind, rain, and sun, all which have created a certain ambiance for the Sip by Sip event.  I walk into the event hearing the high-pitched soothing contralto voice of the band’s lead singer, Jaco Maria, ringing magically in the air back by an inviting percussion. I am handed a glass of the bubbly, a carbonated white wine (champagne?).

Comedian Ndumiso Lindi

Comedian Ndumiso Lindi

After the performance, the entourage of invited guests and others, coming from corporate, business, and individual worlds, go to the ‘comedy’ hall for a genuinely funny 20 minute celebration delivered by comedian, Ndumiso Lindi (aka Roosta).  He certainly offered well-heeled and slick digs at current political and ethnic struggles in the country which didn’t depress, but rather elevated one’s tummy to overall shakes and gaffaws – a delightful pre-lunch appetite booster.

Upstairs in the Idiom Restaurant, our palates received delightfully succulent dishes paired with the Da Capo varieties.  And fine they were:  the Whalehaven Pinotage Rose served with my beetroot salad starter,

Beet root soup & Whalehaven Rose

Beet root soup salad & Whalehaven Rose

Mushroom ravioli with goat cheese & hazelnut

then the white Sangiovese 2013 served with the elegant mushroom filled ravioli.

Mushroom ravioli with goat cheese & hazelnut

Succulence continued with an Amaretto Coffee Tiramisu for dessert, followed by wine tastings downstairs.

Sip by Sip plans to focus on South African wines as it manages events that promote also the other talents of the Cape, namely jazz, chefs, and of course, comedy.  But plan for a whole afternoon out with friends or family, as the entertainment flows through the hours. Besides offering quality-sourced wines and accessories, and a wide range of other services, Sip by Sip events are designed to create memorable experiences through wine tours and tastings, and wine, food and culture pairings.

 

What a wonderful way to showcase the quality and authenticity of South African creative talents. Even if you don’t or can’t drink wine or alcohol, the events are sure to entertain through multi-dimensional experiences with the culinary and the cultural.

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SABC Studios brings live Jazz from the diaspora: Trumpeter Darren English excites!

On Saturday evening, 14 January 2017, the Sea Point/Capetown SABC Studios came alive, even with few people, fans, robust jazz fanatics, family members – to hear and watch the gentle, yet extraordinary, person of trumpeter and drummer, Darren English. Born and bred in Capetown, this now Atlanta-based young music wizard followed his organizational mentor, radio broadcaster Shado Twala, to present a two-nighter of his music before he returns to USA next week, and showcase his Capetown band which offered equally awesome gifts to us listeners.

Darren English at SABC Studios 14 Jan 2017; courtesy: Diane Rossi

Darren English at SABC Studios 14 Jan 2017; courtesy: Diane Rossi

Soft-spoken Darren, dressed in tie and jacket, looked reassured and in control as he swung his band through careful improvisations on some jazz Standards as well as his own compositions featured in his first CD with Hot Shoe Records, entitled ‘Imagine Nation’.

Even though Darren cut his album in the USA (2016) with American musicians, he allowed his stage mates to shine their talents throughout, never dominating the conversations. This humility seems one of his stellar characteristics as a team player….to bring out the best in others.

Mark Fransman. Courtesy: Diane Rossi

Mark Fransman. Courtesy: Diane Rossi

The thoughtful and expressive piano of Mark Fransman was immersed throughout. Double bassist, Benjamin Jephta, highlighted his own presence by vocal scatting his scales with precision. A stunner was drummer, Clement Benny, who just wouldn’t give up. I felt his drums were too aggressive in the 2nd song of the gig, but his handling of a basic drum kit was quite riveting, generally. In one song, Clement joins in a quiet gospel-ish ballad by tapping with an empty plastic water bottle on his symbols. Now there’s another soundscape!

Bass: Benjamin Jephta; drums: Clement Benny; trumpet: Darren English. Courtesy: Diane Rossi

Bass: Benjamin Jephta; drums: Clement Benny; trumpet: Darren English. Courtesy: Diane Rossi

Darren’s own trumpet stayed mainstream and managed to hide impulses to shimmy into fast runs heard on his CD, which was a studio recording. Fortunately, live gigs like this one offer other ways to showcase songs, musicians, and musical emotions.

A welcomed short break to digest the first hour’s arousing offerings prepared us for an exciting and different second set. A trio emerged for the first few songs, this time with Darren on drums with a highly improvising piano and adjoining double bass. Darren enjoys this new physicality, one can hear, as he showcased his other talent, drumming being his early start at home as a pre-teen.

Shado Twala organizer and MC.  Courtesy: Diane Rossi

Shado Twala organizer and MC. Courtesy: Diane Rossi

The evening displayed not just how young talent can grow with multiple types of musical experiences as Darren has witnessed from his jaunts through many States of USA, but how other seasoned local musicians can add value and loyalty through peer growth. Such events also show fan and friend loyalties when people like jazz festival organizer,

Rashid Lombard greeting Darren

Rashid Lombard greeting Darren

Rashid Lombard (of ESPafrika), and Twala, the event organizer, and former teachers and mentors Professor Mike Rossi and Fred Kuit, show up …. At least on this Saturday evening.

With the scarcity of regular jazz ‘clubs’ in Capetown, the SABC Studios with its excellent sound system and comfortable seating should be used more often to support jazz and music culture which so many of us are thirsty for. Thanks to Shado Twala, who works in the building, for organizing this event!!

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Four Blokes, Four Band Leaders highlight free jazz improv

Overflowing crowds packed CapeTown’s venerable jazz venue, Straight No Chaser, this January to imbibe a new year dose of jazz improvisation from four distinguished musicians across several age ranges. Quirky free jazz Capetownian pianist, Kyle Shepherd, elder drummer Louis Moholo-Moholo, and bassist Byron Bolton, brought together British/Caribbean tenor saxophonist, Shabaka Hutchings, for several evenings of unusual performances during the hot week of 13-16 January 2016.

South African drummer Louis Moholo-Moholo

South African drummer Louis Moholo-Moholo

I walk in late. Moholo’s frantic drums are spitting away. Kyle taps away on piano keys influenced by various objects strewn across the piano strings, like wooden sticks and cardboard. Nice harpsichord effect amidst an intense melody-absent improvisation. This foursome chatters, talks about important things, expresses emotion through various thumps, instrumental grunts, plucks and wails.

Now, what are they all talking about? Pianist Kyle then picks up a drum mallet, and starts hitting the piano strings, with purpose, not randomly, it seems. Double bassist Bolton eyes drummer Moholo as they share secret things behind their tapping, bow strumming, and pitter patters. They dance together, not necessarily in rhythmic harmony. There is no ¾ time. There is no time, just presence, the now! Shabaka’s sax offers undertones and subtle nods as a wrestling match ensues. Who’s refereeing this road race? All four of them! It’s intense, and after 25 minutes, I’m exhausted. Time for applause as one watches the two ceiling fans seriously pushing warm breezes in this packed venue. We are all seeking relief from a January heat wave.

This cozy venue of Cape Town’s Straight No Chaser needs to be five times bigger to hold offerings by, simply put, The 4Blokes, who performed additional nights due to popular demand. And still the music fans keep coming to these sold-out shows. The band simply advertise themselves as: “A pioneering free jazz drummer. An award-winning British saxophonist. A virtuoso young pianist. A bowing bass maverick. Four band leaders. 4 Blokes” .

Saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings

The visiting tall lean Londoner saxophonist, Shabaka Hutchings (http://www.shabakahutchings.com/) has a number of impressive awards and experiences with notable bands. His second Sons of Kemet album was released in September 2015 as he continues his research on the musical influences amongst the Caribbean diaspora in Britain. Back to his Cape Town concerts, he survived the ring matches with drummer extraordinaire, 77 year old Louis Moholo, who has absorbed every worldly influence on jazz improvisation since his early beginnings with Chris McGregor’s The Blue Notes, and then the Brotherhood of Breath in the 1960s/70s. Moholo doesn’t age; he just gets better. One doesn’t just ‘listen’ to him; one watches him. He’s very much engaged with his percussive instrument which becomes an extension of his own humanoid discussive personality.

Likewise, the enigmatic bowing bassman, Brydon Bolton, shows prowess when his bowed strings wrestle with the group’s improvisational quackery. He’s another watchable performer bordering on the classical traditions and jazz improve, as manifested in his electro-acoustic band, Benguela.

All four ‘blokes’ are composers with propensities for ‘free jazz’, the experimental, and home ethnics. Theirs is hardly conventional, even though several songs in their recent gigs were traditional bebop jazz of another era. There lies their inexorably creative improvisational talents!

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Joy of Jazz 2015: as mega jazz festivals rise, maybe small is beautiful again

Sis Gwen Jazz BlogGwen Ansell micBy Gwen Ansell SEPTEMBER 20, 2015

The final mega-festival of the jazz year, the Johannesburg Standard Bank Joy of Jazz (JoJ), opens on Thursday (24th Sept 2015) (http://www.joyofjazz.co.za/lineup.php).

Cold Castle Jazz 1962

In programming terms, JoJ finally seems to be learning how to balance the tastes of those wanting a good-time jol and familiar tunes, with those of the seekers after fresh and thought-provoking music. Let’s hope the event also sustains last year’s decent timekeeping, and adds rather more respect for conditions of reception – by, for example, eliminating those intrusive in-hall bars, and requesting audiences to turn off phones and postpone noisy conversations until the playing concludes. (Rather than during a contemplative bass solo, as seems to be the South African norm.)

The jazz festival scene in South Africa is clearly maturing: each of the Big Three – Cape Town, Grahamstown and Johannesburg – now attracts a comfortable audience and each is developing a distinctive character. That maturation ought to start us thinking about alternatives – because while there is much that a mega-festival can do; there is more that it cannot.

Jazz Festival 1964A mega-festival is about entertainment, audience passivity, and music as commodity. Rarely has a setting been more appropriate than the Sandton Convention Centre hosting JoJ. It is sealed within a glittering fortress of consumerism where fools pay absurd prices for imported luxuries under the wary eye of uniformed flunkies. JoJ patrons must spend R500 (for the Thursday gala); R750 (for one day) or R1250 (for two days), plus whatever they have left for food, drink and memorabilia. If you don’t drive – and I don’t – the Convention Centre can be accessed on foot from the Gautrain, provided you can reach a station and afford a ticket. Leaving after midnight is much harder: the Gautrain has stopped running, and even Uber drivers in fancy cars may have problems running the gauntlet of access barriers. These may seem small irritations but they represent significant added costs. The message is clear: jazz is a brand for the affluent only – those equipped to purchase all the other brands that use the music for piggy-back marketing.

Newtown, the festival’s old home, was never an ideal venue in terms of size, sound or distance between stages. But it was a significantly more egalitarian setting in terms of transport access. Even the lousy, leaking sound contributed, allowing those who could not afford tickets to loiter at the edges and hear something. And by its presence, Joy of Jazz affirmed the inner city and the people who live in it.

All that is old history. Jazz can, like any other art-form, be appropriated easily by the smug and comfortable. That does not negate the music’s power in other settings, and with other audiences. It’s time to consider starting some alternative celebrations.

Smaller events earn smaller revenue – but they also require fewer resources. Take over a club for a couple of days – as the Johannesburg International Comedy Festival will do with the Orbit Jazz Club in November – and you need to attract an audience of 400 each night, as opposed to 40 000. Because you are serving a niche, rather than Brand Generic Jazz, you don’t need “stars” – local or overseas – whose relationship to improvised creativity is tenuous or nonexistent. (But there’s always the option of crowd-funding for a relevant airfare or two.) Contexts can be created where South African players – and perhaps visual artists and dancers too – come together in new combinations, and devise new experiences, live, for an audience. Make some spaces where people can talk about what they’re doing and why – because too often we criticize or interpret without listening to the creators themselves. Teach. Take the whole thing to some location where the dinosaur festivals never venture.

Genre labels are always a burden, even when they serve as convenient shorthand. An “improvised music festival”, for example, might run the gamut from baroque concerti with the cadenzas restored to electronica – but it would certainly have plenty of space for the music many listeners call jazz.

Castle Lager Big Band 1963None of these is a new idea – it is, for heavens’ sake, where JoJ was born, in the living rooms of the Mamelodi jazz appreciators. That festival and others like it have, as the businessmen say, now “gone to scale”. Big ticket prices and big marketing underline their commodification; the money-men are risk-averse, and those who can afford to attend and enjoy don’t worry much about those who can’t.

Those who can’t, meanwhile, are the majority of the population: the communities that historically nurtured the music’s best players and were its most astute listeners. School education is still not spreading access to good music teaching fairly; affordability still keeps many young people out of colleges, while we’ve all but lost the universities of the streets. Important spaces are empty at the small-event end of the spectrum, where creativity should be getting its first chances to flower and take risks.

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CapeTown jazz jams at O’Driscolls Irish Pub get down!

Spring/summer IS coming, warming our hearts again with a Wednesday night jazz jam open to all!

Joe Schaffers and guitarist Alvin Dyers are at it again!  Making sure there are weekly jams where musicians, fans, visitors, and students can come and enjoy an evening of sounds from some of Cape Town’s great musicians!  Since several ‘Monday night’ jam venues were closed during my 19 year period of frequenting them (namely, Val’s Cafe and Swingers, both in Wetton), homes have been sought to sustain a regular excitement.  The newer ‘Mannenburgs’ housed on Strand Street in an historic building had to be vacated late last year due to renovations and other factors.

There’s a new kid on the block now – at least for good live jazz!  Central to Cape Town and just one block from its vibrant Green Market Square is a pub called O’Driscolls Irish Pub at 38 Hout St, Cape Town City Centre, Cape Town, 8001   Phone:021 424 7453, open till 2am so they say on their website.

MC Joe Schaffers & Guitarist Alvin Dyers at O'Driscolls

MC Joe Schaffers & Guitarist Alvin Dyers at O’Driscolls

On Wednesday nights, you can sit back at a table or the bar, and down a pint of Guinness while tapping to the music and catch a bite to eat from the affordable menu, offering salad instead of chips for the weight-watchers.

Last Wednesday, 19 August 2015, I popped in as I wanted to commune again with trumpeter Darren English, now based in USA teaching at Atlanta’s Georgia State University Music Department.  Darren, originally from Muizenberg, started his childhood live performance career at a tender age of 15. Couched in a beetles-style hair cut, Darren blew his trumpet to admiring crowds at the Swingers Monday Night jazz jams in Wetton.  His busy father was adamant and loyal about exposing his gifted son to the elements, and accompanied under-aged Darren to this bar/restaurant night club every Monday.

Darren English, trumpet & John Russell, guitar

Darren English, trumpet & John Russell, guitar

Other notables at last Wednesday’s jazz were singer songbird Emily Bruce who, at age 35, is deciding whether to pursue her Doctorate in music or another degree in Marketing, the latter to serve as a ‘real’ income. Mark Fransman, a whiz musician who excels on both piano and saxophones made his appearance as well.  He and Emily were also young guns on the Monday Night jazz jam stages when they had no other platforms to practice their live arts. Guitarist Johnny Russell, another young Swingers hopeful jammed with all of the above.

Emily Bruce & Alvin Dyers

Emily Bruce & Alvin Dyers

MC for these jams, Joe Schaffers, himself an old fixture at the live community jazz gigs and faithful supporter of youth in music, has served with several NGOs in the Cape Flats and Cape Town area serving music educational needs in communities.  As he sings with guitarist Alvin Dyers who kept the jazz jams going for several decades, I could only smile and reminisce how these walk-in and enjoy-yourself jams lightened the end of a day, and afforded musicians and patrons alike opportunities to ‘talk music’ and interact during the evening hours.

Mark Fransman, sax, and Darren English, trumpet

Mark Fransman, sax, and Darren English, trumpet

Who will appear next Wednesday is anyone’s guess! Pop in between 8 – 11pm for a dose!

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Ancestral Heartbeats Code the Music, an interview with award winner pianist Nduduzo Makhathini.

“The greatest moments are when you can’t tell the difference between the piano, or the bass, or the drum, but rather when there’s one wave of sound…… This is consciousness, becoming one with the environment.”

I felt somehow connected with ancestral energies as I drove this youthful bearded jazz pianist to CapeTown’s airport after his weekend gigs with trumpeter, Feya Faku, and local musicians. His performance with Faku’s album launch, “Le Ngoma”, at CapeTown’s popular Straight No Chaser jazz club was a subdued low key presentation of his wider talents. Johannesburg-based Nduduzo Makhathini, originally from Kwa Zulu Natal, is still on a high from being granted Standard Bank Young Artist 2015 award in the Jazz category. I asked him about his philosophy, messages, and what he meant by ‘identity politics’ which he has adopted.

NM: Mine is spiritual, wedded with cultural. I was introduced to music in its religious mode, and later to the business side of music. I grew up as a Christian, going to churches, etc. but I don’t subscribe to any of them. Music moved me into a more spiritual groove. In my youth, I would visit up to four churches on a Sunday just for the music. I loved the gospel messages and sounds. I would leave when the sermons started!

CM: Who else has influenced you besides Zim and Bheki Mseleku?
NM: My mom is my greatest inspiration, and my first piano teacher. I also grew up with the traditional isicathamiya ensembles, or male acopella, like Black Mambazo. I love harmonies which is why this singing drew me to the piano where I can make harmonies myself. I also love harmony in life, which is why I became so close to Bheki who focused on harmonizing things in life. Andre Petersen is also one of my favourites as he expresses inspiration also with Mseleku.

CM: Your three kids are also part of your music journey, aren’t they?
NM: Wow, I have three kids. What a responsibility now! What can I put out there for them? What is left for me by my forefathers, and for them? So my album, “Sketches of Tomorrow” is for my kids. I fused the Western with the traditional African since I have to deal with both cultures, which meet on this album. And they do too.

2015 Standard Bank Young Artist for Jazz- Nduduzo Makhathini. Credit: Adam McConnachie

2015 Standard Bank Young Artist for Jazz- Nduduzo Makhathini. Credit: Adam McConnachie

CM: You talk about healing others. What about healing yourself?
NM: I always feel that the music I play has a message sent through me. Sometimes I don’t understand these messages. So healing goes through me, my system. It tries to heal the space that we’re in, our environment where everyone operates. There are different forms of healing, but I concentrate on the traditional kind in my Zulu culture. I want my family to learn that each and every individual has a role to play on earth, and we need to find out what that is. That’s my ‘politics’, that everyone, equally, has a contribution to offer. We are passing the shacks now [along Cape Town’s N2 highway on route to airport]. Without those people here, this process of honouring each other cannot be complete unless we continue the legacy. That’s why I care for everyone, the kids and people on the streets, and even the more fortunate in the suburbs. These people in shacks barely have the basics for living. My music speaks to them more because these people need healing.

My grandmother was a healer who would have water and pray on it. I asked people to bring water to my gigs, and just have it there in their possession. My music, I believe, then allows the water to capture the healing, and this water has the power of coding certain messages. Mbeki and I used to go to these temples and learn how the spiritual energies were moved by earth elements, and I learned from this. Together, we explored healing as a gift through the language of ingoma or our musicianship.

CM: Regarding your still-to-be launched album, “Listening to the Ground”, I’m curious why you have pulled in the Swedish tenor saxophonist, Karl Martin Almquist, one of my very favourites from northern Europe?
NM: I found him on YouTube, had never met him, but loved his sound. I sent him an email a few years ago, and invited him to join in my latest album. He said, Yes!

CM: Tell me about your album, “Listening to the Ground”.
NM: This is for my ancestors. It’s about the African soil, and African environment, which has so much energy and sounds in it. How deep is the African ground, and how deep is the African soul? In spite of slavery, African people continue to smile, continue to have hope, and till the soil.

CM: Your music you say comes from an ‘external’ force. If you mean a higher Spirit (let’s call it ‘God’), then why can’t this powerful force be ‘internal’ as well? Your project seems to have integral components working together.
NM: Yes, right. I see God as a holistic view of consciousness. It means ‘God’ is a complete picture, both internal and external. The deeper you get into the internal mode of self, the more you can go outside yourself. Like those who had ‘out of body’ experience….. they went so deep inside themselves that they could actually come out of that experience.

SBYA 2015 - jazz. Nduduzo Makhathini

SBYA 2015 – jazz. Nduduzo Makhathini

CM: You’d make a good Buddhist!
NM: Oh, hah hah! I read and listen alot to Osho? On Sundays, with my family in our house, we listen to Osho teachings and alot of music, and learn and discuss. Osho leaves things open for us to look for conclusion. For instance, he observes the cycle of water with this story: There was a stream that flowed for so many years, but then runs into a desert. Osho then panicks wondering how he’s going to find water in this dry desert. But he had another thought: If I become one with the desert and dissolve in it, then I’ll be OK. It then began to rain in a different place and saved his desert. His message was that sometimes, we must dissolve and not take ourselves so seriously. And this is what the exercise of music teaches. I can just let go and not become so absorbed in my individuality. The greatest moments are when you can’t tell the difference between the piano, or the bass, or the drum, but rather when there’s one wave of sound…… This is consciousness, becoming one with the environment.

CM: Are you interested in teaching about this consciousness, environmental holistic healing, and ways to save us all!
NM: It’s always there indirectly. The music is our greatest teaching. My music is universal, always a means to a destiny. Music has a power, something deeper, for people to reach for. I’ve been writing alot, in social media, about what inspires my music. Many people who resonate with my music and its ingoma (musical healing) are not necessarily jazz lovers.

CM: You’re on a journey….particularly with your family. With your mom….And your wife?
NM: My Mom’s very special, supports me 100%, even though she doesn’t have my belief systems. My wife, Nomagugu, is on all my albums. She’s one of my favourite singers. I’ve got my daughter on ‘Mother Tongue’. The three children and my wife finish the last track on “Sketches of Tomorrow”, with my children ending the song: “Oh Nothing; Oh Nothing Again”. I thought what a beautiful message as it came from them listening to the woes about Zimbabwe daughters there, about “Africa’s daughters are without names,” with a loss of identity. So I think it’s amazing how kids can spark this energy in the music we play in the house. In terms of healing the space, the kids and my wife heal that house space which becomes charged with so much energy.

CM: What an experience for the kids! You talked about your Sunday gigs just for the three of them.
Do you record your family sessions?
NM: Oh Oh. No. What an idea! I should record them, you know. We would talk about the gigs, about what is God and existence, and about what they feel in the music, and how the music connects to God, etc. Other kids would tell them about their church experience, but my kids would tell their friends about the music: “Our Dad does gigs for us!” and explain what we played at home that morning.

CM: So your journey continues….
NM: Like Bheki Mseleku who said he never knew how or where to finish a tune, it just kept going and going, with no real ending…… So I think I love the same kind of thing, where music never ends. Durban is a center for guitar harmonies, too, which I love. My father played guitar, so I have been inspired by those traditional sounds . I portray this in the song,“From an Old Bag of Umkhumbane”. I recently discovered that my paternal grandfather came from this town of Umkhumbane which, like Sophiatown, became a melting pot for jazz and music. There was a whole tradition of guitar culture. This is why I like to explore how to express this guitar on the piano.

I’ll be doing my masters at Stellenbosch University through York University partnership. I’ll focus on oral tradition and jazz, and how music has been taught without written music. Similarly, how stories in a song have been orally presented, not written. Written scores present different interpretations, like Winston’s Yakhal’ Inkomo which he authored in a different time. Likewise, I’m dealing with certain things now, but how do I make that song relevant and how do we push this music forward for it to make sense with the generations to come which don’t know much about the history of South Africa? But in this music, certain things can be coded and documented, of history and music.

CM: The coding of music……

At this point, Nduduzo had only half hour to check in for his flight. Our chat could have continued forever….. It will.

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The Bratislava Hot Serenaders and Bandakadabra, gig reviews at Edinburgh`s JBF

One is Slovakian, the other Italian, all high vibe, fun, and humorous, bringing period jazz dance music of 1920-30s alive under our festival tent. What a relief to have concerts with no loud electronic amplification. It didn’t exist back then! Both bands used only one mic. Bratislava`s 19 musicians presented a mix of Ellington Cotton Club songs current in that Harlem community, then moved us across the Atlantic to Slovakian tango and middle European dance music.

The age range of patrons attending this gig was hardly a curve, but rather a flat graph, my honest projection being about 85% of ages 60 plus. The sea of white heads and beards nicely matched the all- male band members` period black-tie costumes, lacquered hair styles, and manicured moustaches. Even the `girls`, the Hot Serenader Sisters who sang their rehearsed harmonies, standing close-faced at the one mic, added imagery to this period `live` documentary. It was indeed fun to watch what my parents had babbled about during my early growth years. The band unadornably played my favorites: Blue Moon, Moon Indigo, and Body and Soul.

With horns, reeds, piano, 3 violins, tuba and banjo all in firey sync, singers took turns at the one mic, sometimes thoughtfully pointing it towards instrumental soloists. I was waiting for them to break out into a Charlestown foot dance!

London`s BBC Dance Orchestra songs also featured. The very humorous renditions of the famous `The Broken Record` and the trumpeter MC`s `Hot Lips` left one laughing into Edinburgh`s rainy evening.

BANDAKADABRA provided a carnival atmosphere of 12 Italian brass, reeds, and drum players rumbling about the stage. Their slapstick humor mixed with period blues between the World Wars made for comic proportions as they banged out Balkan blues and Mediterranean marches. In white ruffled shirts, they acted out ineffective cat calls to the ladies unfortunate enough to sit in the front rows. These rumbling vagabonds truly awakened the kid in all of us without losing any authentic skills in delivering this timeless music.

These groups were such fun! I would go see them again anywhere.

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Swamp Donkeys kick da Blues! a gig review from Edinburgh

You don’t have to walk much for exercise at this Jazz and Blues Festival – there’s enough knee-jerk, foot-stompin` moves provided by the likes of these groovy Swamp Donkeys who very authentically play classic New Orleans early `jass`.

Young Japanese trombonist, Haruka Kikuchi, and newest member of the live band, settled in NO 1/12 years ago because: “I love the NO style of jazz”! Well, and could this beauty deliver one heck of a raspy bone slide with her new- found love, the Swamp Donkeys Traditional Jass Band. “Not many Asians like to play this type of music,” she explained in her broken English, “but I love it”!  Well, isn’t diversity fun?

There’s nothing mimicking about the Donkeys. It’s as though they arose fresh out of the oil-soaked waters of NO`s Louisiana coastline. They don’t play, they speak, and converse: tuba to banjo, to trumpet, to soprano sax, to that swanky sliding bone, so sassy!  Trumpeter James Williams, who sings a girgly Satchmo very well (even his speaking voice sounds a natural Louis Armstrong), recently performed with DeeDee Bridgewater at Capetown`s international jazz festival last March. I think this youthful band should apply for next year’s 2016 CTIJF, and I told manager Oren Krinsky just that.

Cross-legged Williams wallops an astoundingly convincing rendition of 1920s and 1930s-40s southern American Charlestown-style swing as you imagine your own bones dancing away. The banjo and lady trombone conversed in `My Rosetta`, followed by a drunken drawl as Williams` Armstrong-strained vocals told a sad sad story.

The Donkeys insisted on audience participation as we all staggered about, pretending an early morning inebriation with sound, if not with magical liquids.

But it was the soprano sax that grabbed me with his wails, coos, and hip-smacking swing from someone who resembled a teenage apprentice with lots of musical ancestry of the era. This youthful energy could teach the ole timers a thing or two, it seems.

The Donkeys ended their set with their signature tune, `Swamp Donkeys`, sung by all musos, leaving us hip-smackers smiling all the way to the next exhausting concert.

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Compassion shines in this Cold World, gig review of Naomi Shelton

She was a heartland of blues, pounded out with such elegant style and timing. A seasoned wheelchair-bound Naomi Shelton and her Gospel band with bassist/bandleader Fred Thomas (of James Brown band of 1970s) and her 3 Queens delighted her warm standing ovation audience at this year’s Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival. She sang off her latest album, Cold War, thanks to Daptone Records (2014).

I was taken back to the Alabama blues groove native to Shelton, based in New York city for the past half century. Shelton knows the stage, and her Gospel team, along with her husky voice, knows how to reach your soul and tell you “what you done wrong”, like in her visionary `Sinner`song. Her messages that evening of 17 July painted the demise of humanity and human betrayal in our contemporary world.

Edinburgh`s horseshoe shaped St Andrews Square venue provided cramped seating typical of vibey festivals like this one, but gave choice for tables and a bar in the back for the serious listeners/drinkers. At first, the sound system whined, drowning out Shelton`s voice, but got sorted in the end. Shelton was relentless, belting out an Etta James song, `Love Come Along`, which brought lip movements from head bobbing listeners. The `Child is Hungry` remembered the funky beats of the early James Brown.

She moved us to another level, breaking out into a clapping high tempo 4/4 time gospel. The audience moved.

Her finale got the Euro audience on their feet with the funky gospel swing in `Lord, I’m Your Child`.

There was compassion, and revival, and hope as she smiles and throws her kisses reassuringly to us unworthy listeners. Ninety minutes of Shelton pushes you to church in a still redemptive Baptist gospel tradition, yet with secular respect. It was hard to hear anything else that night, other than wanting more of this sanctifying blues!

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Bokani Dyer dyertribes again at Straight No Chaser with Swiss crew

As light rain falls in the middle of Cape Town’s dry winter, Straight No Chaser is the place to be, a manageable venue that handles what warmth seekers want to hear – good live jazz. I walked in on last night’s well advertised gig featuring our own pianist Bokani Dyer who presented his band of seasoned Swiss musicians having musical ties to South Africa. Together, on a country wide tour, his Swiss Quintet performed Bokani’s own ‘dyertribe’ compositions, some from his latest album, ‘World Music’.

Bokani Dyer Swiss Quintet on Tour in South Africa

Bokani Dyer Swiss Quintet on Tour in South Africa

I arrived for the second set, as the first group of patrons were leaving. Entering this small but cozy venue from the chilly wet outside, my eye glasses immediately fogged up. The sauna of human breath was inviting, indeed, and I quickly warmed up as these five musicians took to the stage, thanks to their sponsor, Prohelvetia.

Being a Bheki Mseleku fan (as I am), Bokani performed his own version of Mseleku’s “Cycle” which featured a stunning double bass solo from Stephan Kurmann, followed by a piano duet which sounded very much like the late great Mseleku we knew. Trumpeter Mattias Spillmann started the next song rustling an A4 paper as the bass punctuated. Bokani plucked his piano strings. Drummer Norbert Pfammatter fell in with a steady funky beat. Then, Spillmann put his hat on his trumpet to act like a muffler, another innovative ‘hat trick’! I called this ‘trumpet ruffles while hat muffles’ as the song’s name wasn’t announced.

Mattias Spillmann's hat muffler

Mattias Spillmann’s hat muffler

The final song, “Fanfare”, struck off with a familiar South African beat – again a Mseleku sound – with an extraordinary saxophone solo by Donat Fisch followed by an equally competitive one by the trumpet. It was a finale making any outside inclement weather little to care about.

The Bokani I knew from the past was shining, as usual. But he has lost his dredlocks. His shaved head grown out a little bit connotes him as avant-garde, plain, older, but simpler. I guess a Bokani in the raw!! I grew up with big Afro -black-is-beautiful heads. OK, I’m outdated….

Bokani’s set perked me up. Mind you, at 10.20pm, on a rainy chilly night at the bottom of this hemisphere, I could have dealt with bed. Easily. The trek out was worth it! And why the Swiss four? In May 2014, Bokani did a residency in Basel at the Bird’s Eye Jazz Club where he performed with his Swiss comrades who, individually, carry a wealth of experience with worldly views, including performing with notable South African musicians like Abdullah Ibrahim, Feya Faku, Marcus Wyatt, etc.

Bokani with Marlon & Shane

I now look forward to digesting his new CD, ‘World Music’, which Bokani recorded with South Africans he has grown up with. The 12 songs promise another dyertribe special, I’m sure!

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Another meet-up with Somi at SNC – a gig review by C Martin

Somi at Straight No Chaser on Wed, 6 May 2014

This pan-African singer, who proudly hails from Ugandan and Rwandan parentage, pleased too few listeners on Wednesday evening, 6 May, at one of Capetown’s premier jazz clubs, Straight No Chaser, on Beitankant Street. II first saw her at Johannesburg’s Joy of Jazz a few years ago, and was blown away!

Somi's latest Album

Somi’s latest Album

Her New York- based band of international artists shared her planetary space on the small stage as she swung through a repertoire of African- and Arab-influenced contemporary jazz songs. Her influences have recently accumulated from an 18 month study and research stay in Lagos, Nigeria, where she could compose songs that highlight the pop, soul, and jazz of that cosmopolitan African city and beyond. Her latest album, released last year, “The Lagos Music Solon”, speaks to that.

Somi is straight, elegant, and humble in her demeanor. On stage she breathes the African way, and swings her body in rhythm the African way. Her first piece was taken from singer/pianist Nina Simone. Somi shimmers with body emotion which exudes short rhythmic breaths, characteristic in African dance. I watched her guitarist who grooved as he sight-read the score. Nevertheless, he offered some splendid runs. Then her Japanese pianist took over, adding further excitement to Somi’s stage gyrations.

The electrifying drummer presented his steady taps in “I’m Still Your Girl” . Then, the bassist of Greek origin broke out with a southern Indian scat which fit the rhythm of the drums. His Tamil scat accompanied by his own bass added further electric energy which you don’t hear here in Cape Town! A third song, introduced with a drum solo, featured Somi singing in the African idiom as the band strummed out a reggie beat. The guitar wails its answer and talks with the singer. And more mesmerizing songs kept coming…..

As Somi thanked the crowd for their presence, she folded into a melodic Africa-south-of-the-Sahara –meets-north-Africa-Arabian twist and explained how her Ugandan and Rwandan ancestry gave rise to her breath scat, which she repeated in a drum duet. We were all spellbound with this ancestral sounding of presence and purpose – Proud to be African. In her last song of the evening, she displayed what seemed like a synopsis of the hour’s set: ziggy ziggy stage movements with her body, slinking sideways, then forward, then sideways again, her voice following the panic of guitars and drums making their crescendos before the solo piano finally takes us all away.

Among several notable positions held, as both an artist and scholar, Somi has been a TED Senior Fellow, and has performed at a major United Nations Memorial event. She has studied both African and Arab jazz traditions, and in 2015, serves as Artist-in-Residence at UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance and The Robert Rauschenberg Foundaton.

It is no wonder that Somi is completing a jazz opera about South African singer Miriam Makeba, her life and legacy. Somi performs again on Thursday, 7 May 2015 at the Straight No Chaser club at 8.30pm and 10pm. On 8 and 9 May, she appears at Johannesburg’s The Orbit jazz club. Not to be missed!! And if you can’t make those gigs, see her at www.somimusic.com.

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Other worldly haunts of the Kyle Shepherd Trio by AJR Webitor Carol Martin Gig Review

Straght No Chaser Cape TownKyle Shepherd and his merry bassist Shane Cooper and eclectic drummer Jono Sweetman offered another ‘Kyle special’ at Straight No Chaser Club on Friday and Saturday, 20 – 21 March. In fact, I went twice!!

Kyle, Jonno and Shane

Kyle, Jonno and Shane

Both nights seemed completely different in Kyle’s offerings:

On Friday, I heard new compositions, one using daunting loops of electronica for all instruments. This is Kyle’s ‘other worldly haunts’, as I would call them, as he brings his audience into a less melodic, highly improvisational, but not less emotional soundscape of electronic whispers, cries, and groans. His other pieces brought us back to the acoustic world of reality as we know it, a lovely fusion of his Cape ghoema rhythms in that key of C major which he delivers so well.

On Saturday night, I must confess I had just come from the Kunnuji Experiment concert at the College of Music, where I was inundated with West African sounds. Perhaps I should not have ‘dropped by’ SNC as my mind could not adequately grasp those Kyle compositions, again new to my ears, as it should. What I did note from this eve’s gig was the inexhaustible skill which bassist Cooper displays in his solo runs, plunks, and percussive hits as he adds beats complementing drummer Jono. The latter excels in tempering his delivery according to the emotion of the minute. The moral of the story is: clear your head, first, before embarking on an evening with Kyle’s trio. They require utter and full attention as they continue their creative journeys…..which seem endless, so far.  Catch Kyle at this weekend’s Jazz Festival !!

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South African College of Music comes alive with West African jazz reviewed by AJR Webitor Carol Martin

UCT FBSACM 150The past weekend featured some more surprises of talent on the Cape Town jazz scene! In fact, I don’t think I saw and heard any artist over 30 years of age – now isn’t that refreshing?

Jo Kunnuji Experiment with Zoe Madiga

 

I’ve already interviewed Nigerian trumpeter Jo Kunnuji (http://www.alljazzradio.co.za/2014/11/10/carol-martin-interviews-nigerian-jazz-trumpeter-jo-lanre-kunnuji/ – posted 10 November 2014) but this time had a chance to hear his latest ‘Jo Kunnuji Experiment’ album-in-the-making live at the South African College of Music’s recital hall at the University of Cape Town. His tight band of four horns with backline presented a small paying audience with his impressive compositions which improvised on sounds from his own southern Nigerian community and from South African influences. His songs speak proudly about his small minority Badagry group near the Benin border with Nigeria. As happens with minorities, the leviathan of larger groups gobble up remnants of culture into a fused mix of behaviours, expressions, and – in this case – sounds with percussive rhythms of the dominant group, the Yoruba. Still, the songs Kunnuji was able to craft explore a new ‘high life’ of West African melodies and beats as this young gun forges a history of salvaging Ogun expressions.

I enjoyed the clear and well-arranged harmonies of the horns played by fellow jazz studies students (Robin Fassie Kock on flugel horn, Tristan Weitkamp on Tenor sax, Georgie Jones on Baritone sax, along with his trumpet). These instrumentalists were tightly in tune with each other, accompanied by clean piano runs of Blake Hellaby. The rhythm section added depth and included Graham Strickland on bass and Cameron Claassen on drums. Kunnuji badly needed a larger bongo or African drum player to bring out the traditional West African percussion flavours; he had to hold his trumpet under his arm as he played two hands on his small but soft Bongos, barely audible. A highlight of the generously offered two set program was singer Zoe Modiga with her crisp youthful voice. She will gain hoots and whistles for sure at this weekend’s CapeTown International Jazz Festival when she opens the Moses Molelekwa stage on Friday evening as well as performs at the Wednesday evening CTIJF free concert at Greenmarket Square.

The Kunnuji Experiment upcoming album promises to be a refreshingly new twist to ‘Afro jazz’ while showing off Kunnuji’s improvisational skills, a product no less seasoned by hard work and serious creative intentions he has pursued during his stay with us in South Africa.

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GIG REVIEW– BENGUELA MONDAY’S with guest vocal instrumentalist JULIA VENTER

Straight no Chaser1Straight No Chaser – 79 Buitenkant St. Cape Town, Western Cape.

What does one do on a Monday night after a weekend of watching various sports on the goggle box or pushing the peddles along the cycle routes, or running up hills and dales or just for that matter just drinking beer or Pinotage and chomping braai chops or potjie kos. What’s done is done neh!. The choice of going to hear some jazz is generally the right thing to do, that’s according to rule 17 on my daily rules of living in Cape Town. I was called by Cape Town Crooner and genial gentle man Joe Schaffers who gave the phone on introducing me to Robert Rodrigues who is here for the CTIJF for the Jazzizz magazine, the festival looms large, with that in view I suggested we meet at Straight No Chaser to catch Benguela in performance. I informed the AJR Weditor Carol Martin of the arrangement and we duly met at the venue. After the introductions I decided it was beer ‘or clock so got a bottle of liquid chilled golden craft elixir and settled down for the nights entertainment.

BENGUELA logoNow, I’d not been to hear Benguela for quite a while so was filled with excited anticipation. The band is Alex Bozas (guitar, foot peddle gizmos) Brydon Bolton (electric bass and a box of foot operated thingies), Ross Campbell (drums and his inbuilt eclectic rhythm mixer), he must be part human and part robot, sjoe!

BENGUELA band

Benguela, Alex, Brydon and Ross

The three minstrels masters of mind blowing sonic improvisational experimental spatial exploration got the evening started and was soon joined by the evening’s guest performer, Juliana Venter who was to showcase her remarkable vocal instrument. It was my first exposure to her powerful vocal athletics. She took one to unimagined places where many others would fear to go soaring into the sonic stratosphere with her explorative collaborator’s then down into the depths of an anguished soul.

Juliana Venter

Juliana Venter

The primordial scream of freedom seldom heard on any performance platform other than S.N.C. Her voice like naked dervishes dancing around a sacrificial, cleansing fire swept to life by the cacophony of sonic wind fuelling sounds of pain and pleasure, exposed, raw and vulnerable, Not for the fainthearted, yet still something to be heard. The performance reminded me of an early Bjork mixed with a little of Die Antwoord’s Yolandi without any of the theatrics, which was a good thing. Powerful interplay between all of the instrumentalist’s captured the attention of the small devoted audience, which I’m told is growing, and offers a Monday nights escape from the boredom of everyday life, Benguela Mondays are a foil to that boredom where one can roam free in a sonic tide of experimental independence. No need to be afraid, go listen to Benguela, their weekly guests and keep the mind open to endless possibilities.

Straght No Chaser Cape Town Audience

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Lyra Restaurant Monday Night Jazz Jam, Monday, 9 March 2015, with visiting sax/vocalist AJ Brown by Carol Martin

I usually just ‘pop in’ to Lyra’s in Rondebosch to check out Dan Shout’s band which introduces so eloquently the jam that is to follow with visiting musicians and students who hover about.  This time I decided to eat…..and why not?  Lyra’s boasts a delectable menu of chops which nicely accompany the musical chops offered.  I chose the Fettuccine Alfredo, one of my favourite pasta dishes, at least when cooked right.  And it was. Also at my table was All Jazz Radio’s Klutz in the Kitchen, Eric Alan, who agreed that this restaurant deserved his four-star rating.  Eric’s own posting about the restaurant’s food offering that evening alerted the grandson of my dish’s creator (Mr. Alfredo di Lelio), who tells the story about just how this dish came to be at Rome’s ‘Alfredo’ restaurant in 1914.  It’s fun reading in ‘comments’ at http://www.alljazzradio.co.za/wp-admin/edit-comments.php .

Now the music: an eclectic group of local musos including pianist Andrew Ford and double bassist Romy Brauteseth accompanied a visiting British saxophonist and vocalist, AJ Brown, who toured the CapeTown venues for several weeks with packed out audiences. Here, AJ could shine for the students who flocked to watch him.  I heard a skilful crooner, scatter, adding swing wherever possible, as he romped through well-known standards.  I felt alive with the band. But it was his sexy sax that grabbed me, with Parker-like runs and wails that could even compete with Dan Shout’s accomplishments.  But here was no competition; just plain camaraderie, fun, and sharing, as he joined other musicians in  song. Thanks to Dan, AJ was invited to bless us with his intimate renditions of romantic, popular, and funky standards, a true crooner who holds his notes and random beats very well. You can hear his songs on his website: http://www.aj-brown.co.uk.   Travel well, AJ, and please come back to us!

This is what makes Lyra’s Monday Night Jazz Jams a feast of sounds, eats, and fun. Highly recommended, particularly that tall Windhoek draft!

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Review of Pops Mohamed/Dave Reynolds Workshop, 7 March 2015 by Carol Martin

As part of the Music Exchange, Red Bull Studios, and SA Concerts collaboration, two extraordinary music specialists in African traditional instruments came together in Cape Town on 7 March 2015 for a workshop with an audience involved in the music industry.  Pops Mohamed specializes in a variety of African instruments, but on this day, he showcased the wonders of the Mbira Kalimba, or ‘thumb piano’, and the African mouth bow and kora instruments.  His partner in crime, Dave Reynolds reigned in his steel pans which offered historical juxtapositions with African xylophone sounds and rhythms. Their exchange was part of a wider concert performance schedule that reached the public in Cape Town with not only eclectic traditional African sounds, but messages from histories of how such instruments emerged.

Such was the focus of this Saturday workshop – to have the music industry give more serious thought to supporting a future which continues to preserve these cultural artefacts and their history as well as their application to our contemporary musical world.  Reynolds, an award-winning South African composer and multi-instrumentalist,  gave an impressive background to his and Mohamed’s enthusiasm for their cause:  He cited the ‘father of African ethnomusicology’, Hugh Tracey, who, for some 40 years until his death in 1977, travelled widely in southern Africa recording music of the various societies, and learning some 20 African languages in the meantime. His son, Professor Andrew Tracey, born in 1936 in Durban, continued his father’s legacy.  Together, they had founded Kwanongoma College of African Music in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe in 1960. Andrew continued to research southern African music focusing on the various sounds in the mbira and xylophone families of traditional instruments. This explains Andrew’s passion for steel pan instruments, which also explains why Pops Mohamed and Dave Reynolds are a natural duo to perform such traditions.

Dave Reynolds & Pops Mohamed

“The business of music involves learning the future”, said Reynolds. This implies preservation.  One way to do this is to NOT see culture in an instrument:  “I deliver my own identify, what is me, when I play the pans,” he says.  He explained that the steel pans are a hybrid percussion developed in the Caribbean islands amongst slaves who were not permitted to make drums of skins. So you see an instrument for what it can deliver, and in this way, that instrument can travel and combine with other sounds. It’s not only rooted to a ‘culture’.

Pops Mohamed

Pops Mohamed, who grew up in Benoni and is known for his wide range of musical styles, has led the struggle to bring cultural music history of African peoples to the present and beyond. He cited an interesting history of how the hand piano Kalimba was popularized by the American pop group, ‘Earth Wind and Fire’, back in the 1960s-70s, and had bought rights to the Kalimba’s symbol which originally was produced by Dr. Hugh Tracey!  But it was Mohamed’s own time period of growing up that molded his appreciation and eventual collaboration with the great South Africans of the 1960s struggle against apartheid.  Hanging out with his Dad at shebeens back then, or making a home-made guitar and playing it in the high school bands, and jamming with the penny whistlers – all remained as memories, such fun never recorded.  It was in 1996 that Mohamed committed to a mission to protect and preserve this ‘cattle music’, as the apartheidists called it, the music of the indigenous.  In London, the drum ‘n bass platform of DJs became an opportunity for Mohamed to expose young people to African indigenous sounds. “Go with your signature – tell people about your instrument as a viable South African technique. Then mix it will all the other styles and modes of music, the pop, funk, classical, and jazz, in helping to appreciate how such sounds can produce authentic compositions.  And be proudly South African about it.”

Besides delving into the instruments’ roots, the duo added flavour by performing their pieces.  It’s when Afrikaans vernacular hip-hop artist and rapper, Jitsvinger (alias Quintin Goliath), joined in a jam to add the traditional Khoi spoken word to the duo’s presentations that the indigenous mixtures bubbled harmoniously. The versatility of Mohamed’s exchange between the mouth bow with attached gourd, alternating with his mbira and kora and bird whistle, also highlighted the occasion. The audience not only listened, but also participated by passing around rattles made from metal keys and bamboo and bean shakes which added soft percussive rhythms.

Time ran out, after this two hour session, with listeners eager to talk more, considering what stimulation they would take home with them that day. Similar workshops are being conducted by Pops and Dave this week at other Capetown venues, and more concerts have been added.  More is yet to come from this inventive and inspirational duo in the future…..which is what preservation is all about.

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REVIEW of Workshop #4, “Sustainable Training and Development” of SAACT By Carol Martin

“You all know what black duck tape is used for, right?” And your “DI box” and “comset” should be working OK. “Oh, and don’t forget to check the jack-to-jack and the plug strip,” says the facilitator. If this sounds like music babble, that’s exactly right. “And you artists need to know terms used when stage managers and sound engineers are producing YOUR show!”

This was how the final of four workshops ended an impressive “Sustainable Training and Development” program during February 2015 at the Cape Town International Convention Center. For the past four years, the South Atlantic Arts and Culture Trust (SAACT) and ESPAfrika, with supports from the Western Cape Education Department, has sponsored these educational events for a variety of school bands from all economic zones of the municipality. Seven Cape Town high school bands were represented as the ‘focus’ schools for this year’s training program, and their bands will perform at Artscape for the public on Sunday afternoon, 22 March before the CapeTown International Jazz Festival starts that Friday, the 27th. Topics of the workshops included festival overview, marketing, hospitality and logistics, safety overviews, and technical stage overview.

Charl Babyboy Pilwan, age 31, was the guest artist and spoke to the awed youth audience on this Saturday, 28 February. His illustrious life and work in various countries since arriving in London in 1998 to school there landed him big-name contracts with principally Asian bands as their singer. Cape Flats-born Charl has finally returned to his original home of Cape Town. Here he hopes to work more with youth, and be a model for those aspiring youth bands and artists, particularly helping them understand the whacky world of the music business. He offered worthy advice for the teenage initiates: “Be humble, stay grounded and proud of where you come from, and work hard. Be nice to people, particularly the production companies AND engineers who record you. Don’t burn bridges, but be open and receptive to your colleagues. Start at home and get your supports, if at all possible, from family and friends.” Oh, and ‘branding’ yourself is also important.

Charl’s own journey wasn’t easy in terms of supports, as he started his foreign experience living on the streets of London – a dark hole in his youth – but ended up with his own production company, a branch which he is opening in Cape Town. He knows how to talk to youth: “I had to learn to cut my own hair ‘cuz Chinese people don’t know how to cut black people’s hair,” he recounted about his time working on the Chinese island of Macau. He is also proudly South Africa, boasting a big South African flag tattoo on his arm. “Finish your education,” he also implores youth.

But it was the indefatigable Camillo Lombard, an extraordinary operator from the heart, who always wins the kids’ respect. His advice is: ‘Be ready! Manage your band! Know the songs well beforehand so that it’s easy to step into rehearsals with a thorough familiarity of the songs. Practice, and stay humble.” Interesting how the term ‘humble’ keeps popping up when speaking to youth. “Your attitude translates to your aptitude. Fly high!

Focus Schools Workshop 28Feb 2015: credit C.Martin

Did the youth audience understand all this? I talked with some of the students: “It sounds like alot of work.” “Ya, it’s important to have good band members who are your friends.” Many commented on how helpful the “Skills Transfer Manual” was; the Manual covered the four workshops plus offered homework and skills practice during the week. I asked how they felt about Charl’s comment that musicians need to get to know each other, and did these youth do this during the workshops? “Well, there wasn’t really time to mix. The program was quite full.” So, I’m wondering how, in the future, bands at workshops can interact more personally, rather than just in rehearsals or on stage.

I asked the girls why there weren’t more females in the bands. “There’s quite a few of us, but we don’t easily get a chance to practice.” Several girls had asked questions during the plenary, but were not seen at stage demonstrations during this workshop. Questions revolved around how to start a production company and technical aspects of producing the right sound for a particular venue.

I wonder if host, Craig Parks of ESPAfrika, and his other facilitators (all male) could have tried a bit harder to encourage that public exposure of girl instrumentalists on stage. There’s always female singers, but I witnessed the girl’s instrument bags shoved under their tables while the guys licked their reeds, readying for a sound demonstration. At lunchtime, I managed to be entertained by the Chris Hani High School’s male acapella choir humming through their full mouths.

The bands came from these high schools: Chris Hani, Elsies River, Heathfield, Langa (Music Project), Pinelands, Settlers, and Wynberg. Follow-up mentoring at each school by Lombard and others will prepare the bands for their Festival stage performances, again, thanks to the WCED.

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Buddy Wells Quintet at Straight No Chaser, 5 March 2015

And what a fantastic gig it was! Buddy and group at their best, with some enthusiastic new material.

Trevor Wells says it perfectly on FB:
“Tight, Tight. Tight. Great rhythm section. Great duets on the horns. Brilliant solos by all. Harmonics and overtoning on sax takes this into an art form beyond what has been heard anywhere in the world. Intonation superb. At times pythogorean, At times mean toned. Tension contrasted by relaxation in both the harmonies and the rhythms moves this group into the realms of performance art top class groups all over the world aspire to attain. Well Done. It’s About Time.”

Watch these young guns: Nick Williams (bass), Keenan Ahrends (guitar), Jonno Sweetman (drums) and Steven Sokuyeka (trombone) as they plod through original compositions having a strong traditional South African jazz and folk lore.

This group needs to record, studio or liveBuddy Wells, and spread their unique sounds!

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Rukma Vimana at Alliance Francaise/CapeTown on Friday, 27 February 2015

by Carol Martin

The Alliance Francaise on Loop Street in Cape Town came alive last Friday evening with its special music-backed cuisine offering Brittany crepes and candle-lit tables (no, there was no load-shedding that night, and who needs that for candlelight, anyway??). Thanks to songbird Titilayo Adedokun who helped organize the event, three illustrious jazz musicians were again brought together to announce their profound appreciation for the indigenous sounds of the Cape’s ‘first people’s’. The concert featured notable tastes of the Khoi songs and other improvisational styles of ‘Rukma Vimana’, a trio of multi-instrumentalist Hilton Schilder (mouth and regular piano, mouth bow, and guitar), his cousin double bassist Eldrid Schilder, and youth drummer upstart, Claude Cozens (who last year launched his first eclectic CD scoring points on his own jazz idiom ala ghoema, bebop, gospel, and funk). These Cape Flat musicians carry weight when it comes to producing authentic sounds of the local soil, with rhythms that also get you jumpin’. Titilayo’s series of monthly concerts planned for the future are appropriately called “Jazz Rendez-vous @ Alliance Francaise”. This is a fun way to combine local with French, and indeed, the evening was worth the minimal costs incurred.

Each trio member had a chance to solo, or in a New Orleans dialect, we’d say, “strut your stuff”! All felt comfortable with their own space and sound. They specialize in their own way in these sounds and ghoema rhythms. But it was Hilton who varied the concert repertoire to include his own soft, melodic, and soulful solos which tell stories of their own. The accordion-like mouth piano added a bit of ‘French’ sound to an otherwise local South African song, and the San mouth bow gave its moments. The audience had to listen. And it did with applause. Hilton’s own compositions featured prominently, too. I particularly liked his tribute to Jai Reddy’s rather unusual flying visions and patented products pertaining to planes and insects, in “Flying High”.

Which leads me to understand why the trio is called ‘Rukma Vimana’ – after Reddy’s own aeronautical skills, or rather from an ancient Indian experience of manufacturing a pear-shaped type of aircraft with unusual ducts and fans for airlift….. Well, let’s rest with the other types of fans who will easily lift off as this group replicates the free flying aura of sound-with-soul, combined with emotion and storytelling, of a local type.

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Debut of The Lee Thomson Experience at Straight No Chaser

Straght No Chaser Cape TownLast night (Friday) I headed to Cape Town’s best and only real jazz club, Straight No Chaser. The venue offers unbridled joy of listening to the great music and musicians in performance without the din and clatter of waiter service. Pure jazz all the way, how it should be served to the audience. This night it was the debut of The Lee Thomson Experience, led so ably by the very busy and highly underrated trumpeter, naturally yep you guessed it, Lee Thomson, trumpet, flugel horn and instrument not often seen on the stages of Cape Town, (the pocket trumpet). Band leader Thomson was joined on stage by vocalist Bonj Mpanza, pianist Nick Williams, incredible rhythm master drummer Kesivan Naidoo and incomparable bassist Romy Brauteseth whose task it was to re-imagine the repertoire of traditional and contemporary jazz standards from Miriam Makeba and Duke Ellington to Beyonce and beyond.

Thomson has yet, after all these years to release an album of his own. Here he has the right vehicle to do so, a great combination of musicians to make sure of an awesome debut album. Something I have been on at him for years, I do hope it will be much sooner than later.The Lee Thomson Experience Lee

I was looking forward to hearing vocalist Bonj Mpanza, whom I’d not heard before. When she alighted the stage after an introduction by Thomson she told us she was going to start off with Allan Mzamo Silinga’s beautiful and so well known tune Ntjilo Ntjilo. In doing so she was paying tribute to the late Miriam Makeba. Pianist Williams rose to the occasion with his intro to the song which was just truly sublime, then Mpanza’s voice rang out like the clarion bells of the close by St Georges Cathedral, big and powerful. I thought we were all in for a real treat; she then went on with Mackay Davashe’s Lakutshon’ilanga and followed that with Winston Mankunku Ngozi’s Give Peace a Chance. By this time I was not really enjoying her performance because of her continued use of a delayed echo foot peddle. It was annoying and terrible with words and voice colliding into one another; she was doing battle with herself creating an unpleasant cacophony, oh, why did she choose to spoil her magnificent instrument with the totally unneeded electronic gadgetry. There may be a time and place to use such things perhaps, but most of the time during the set it was not. The few times she did not use the infernal thing she really show what a classy voice she has. Other than that The Lee Thomson Quintet was on point and showed huge potential as a unit to really watch out for, the future is bright for The Lee Thomson Experience. It was a huge privilege to be a part of the listening audience. When next they perform make sure to not miss the event.

2014 Support Local Music

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Table Mountain Blues Summit 2014 – 6 and 7 December, Hillcrest Quarry, Durbanville

 

TABLE MOUNTAIN BLUES SUMMIT 2014

TABLE MOUNTAIN BLUES SUMMIT 2014

TABLE MOUNTAIN BLUES SUMMIT 2014

6 & 7 December, Hillcrest Quarry, Durbanville.

 

Blues is a natural fact, it is something that a fellow lives.” Big Bill Broonzy.

 

South Africa’s Premier Blues Music Festival returns to Hillcrest Quarry in Durbanville, Cape Town on the 6th and 7th of December 2014. Hosting 20 of the country’s top Blues Rock Artists over 2 days, the 2014 concert is proudly presented and brought to you by local main sponsor COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY and also with great sponsor support by PAUL BOTHNER MUSIC and FENDER SA.

 

So friends and fans, all you need is a ticket and them’ blue suede shoes (whether real or imaginary) to come and enjoy the finest music making by the following phenomenal local artists:

 

Dan Patlansky, Albert Frost Trio, Boulevard Blues, The Blues Broers, Gerald Clark and the Deadmen, Pebbleman, Ann Jangle, Dave Ferguson, Mean Black Mamba, Natasha Meister, Crimson House, Basson Loubscher & Violent Free Piece, The Wayne Pauli Trio, Patrick Canovi’s ‘Kiss the Sky’, Piet Botha and Akkedis, The Parlor Vinyls, Charlie King Band, Nhoza Sitsholwana, Riaan & Nick, Fake Leather Blues Band and Sven Blumer.

 

This year the Blues Summit rocks on a Saturday and a Sunday. Organizer Richard Pryor says: “Ain’t the Blues just too good on a Sunday? We moved the Friday night to a Sunday so that it is easier to bring your whole family for an awesome day out.”
What you can look forward to on the Blues Menu for the Summit:

  • 20 top Bands over 2 days.
  • Top class quality 30000 watt outdoor sound rig! The best rig ever !!!
  • Huge Lighting and a huge LED screen.
  • Hillcrest Quarry is one of the finest outdoor venues in SA
  • Vibrant food and refreshment stalls and plenty of outside bars
  • Plenty of free and secure off street parking
  • Fender Guitar Giveaway and the Combustion Technology Cash Prizes R1500
  • Free entrance for children under 10 (must present some form of ID)
  • Limited camping tickets for sale on Computicket (Camping costs R150 -separate to festival ticket)

 

Phone and book at Computicket on 0861 9158000 or visit

www.computicket.com for your piece of the Blues Rock action: Tickets R200 – R340.

 

http://online.computicket.com/web/event/table_mountain_blues_summit_2014/840036015/424895727

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/32871020291

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/679364385485915/679364388819248

 

Make sure you land at Hillcrest Quarry on the 6th and 7th of December and we’ll give you a musical thrill that’s going to groove your Soul and move your Body!

 

www.bluesfest.co.za

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A night of really great jazz but for the rest a night to forget. Thursday 24th July 2014

What is it with customer service and worst of all call centres it was my luck to have two problems on the same day.

The Five Rooms Restaurant Logo borderAlphen Hotel LogoI trundled off to The Five Rooms Restaurant at the Alphen Hotel in Constantia on Thursday night to listen to visiting expat Capetonian composer and saxophonist Mark Ginsberg, who’d let me know he was to be playing at the venue, a place I’d not visited in ages. On arrival I was greeted with a warm, friendly smile by the hostess who asked where I’d like to be seated, as I was alone I said the bar

Mark Ginsberg

Mark Ginsberg

would do fine. The atmosphere was warm and was busy. After a while I finally got the bar persons attention to get a beer to slake my thirst, but was disappointed to see the only beer on tap was Castle or Pironi, not being a Castle fan of long standing, there was little choice as when I’m in a pub I always like to enjoy a draft. It’s a real shame being forced forced to settle on the Pironi rather than the Castle or bottled beer. I would have thought the Alphen Hotel would have had a couple of Craft beers on tap at such an lovely “Olde World” pub.

Andrew Lilly

Andrew Lilly

Mike Campbell bass player cape town

Mike Campbell

The band started off and what a band it was, Mark blowing the sax with Andrew Lilly playing the keyboard Mike Campbell plucking the electric bass with Kevin Gibson keeping the beat behind his drum kit, all well season jazz musicians, and the standard showed in the they music

Kevin Gibson

Kevin Gibson

played. The standout tune of the first set for me was Winston Mankunku Ngozi’s Yakhal’ Inkomo,

Winston Mankunku Ngozi as I remember him with his impish delightful smile

Winston Mankunku Ngozi as I remember him with his impish delightful smile

Mark seemed to have been channelling the late Winston, it is a sublime rendition to my way of thinking as memories flooded back of hearing and interacting with the impish Mankunku so many times in the living years, there was even a tear brought to my eye. The band played as if they’d been playing together for years.

I looked at both of the menus and settled on what I wanted to order from the Lounge Menu, in the meanwhile I was seat smack dang in the middle of a busy thoughrafarewith waiters and the manager sculling all over the place and not one asked if I needed assistance. The lounge area and other rooms were where all the attention was focused. I don’t for a minute believe any of the staff didn’t see that my intention was to order. Musically I enjoyed the evening and with two drafts down, I was hungry so decided to head home and on the way, stop off at the

Steers It's That Good……No It Ain't

Steers It’s That Good……No It Ain’t

Steers at the Engen Service Station close to home in Claremont, another huge mistake. On arriving at the service counter the staff were milling around nattering away to one another taking no notice of me as a customer. After a good 7 minutes or so one of the counter servers finally decided to take my order on a Hero Roll medium rare with Chips, second mistake. Then another crowd of staff arrived and yep you guessed it another round of story telling. Waiting patiently for my order and not a manager in sight I eventually the food, and headed home. On the way home I munched on the hot chips and arrival I plated the

Steers Hero Steak Roll, don't judge by the picture, in reality it's plain blerry awful

Steers Hero Steak Roll, don’t judge by the picture, in reality it’s plain blerry awful

Hero and remainder of the Chips. The Hero was a soggy mess so sauce laden, the roll just fell to pieces on being picked up with the steak, lettuce and tomato going all over the place. Then got a Knife and Fork to try to eat the thing after washing all the sauce off my hands. The steak was very overcooked and like cardboard which I could not eat and in disgust disposed of. Steers claim to have the best chips of all burger joints by using real potatoes but they tasted rancid like the oil had been used 4 or 5 times too long. A horrendous night out and on a really terrible rainy night of which I think the rain and the jazz was the best thing.

I complained to both organisations managements and have not heard much from the Alphen Hotel, the restaurant manager who I called the day after to register my dissatisfaction did not even bother to say that they’d get back to me with an update on the status of my complaint, all she said was she hoped that I would give them a try again. After a really torrid time in trying to get the contact details first from the Steers Call Centre, I finally managed to find the phone number of the regional Steers office from the Steers corporate website, note, not the actual Steers website and left a message for someone to call me. That happened around two hours later the management person was sympathetic and helpful and said the regional manager would call

Aunty Sarah’s World Famous Pea and Hock/Bacon Stoup

Aunty Sarah’s World Famous Pea and Hock/Bacon Stoup

me to update me on the status of my complaint. That was Thursday evening, a night to remember and to forget. that jazz was really try good and the only redeeming thing of a wasted night, I look forward to the weekend rain and all, and will get the Klutz In The Kitchen to make a huge pot of  to keep on hand so as to have something nutritious handy when something of the nature occurs again.

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Friends of De Waal Park and Re/MAX Living Concert Series for 2012/2013 – LINEUP ANNOUNCED

de waal park bandstand

de waal park bandstand

Following the success of the inaugural De Waal Park Summer Concerts in 2011/2012 the Friends of De Waal Park and Re/MAX Living are once again going to bring great music to the Park in Oranjezicht.

And the 2012/2013 line-up is bigger and better than ever with some of South Africa’s best, and most popular, musicians and bands in the line-up.

Jimmy Dludlu, The Rudimentals, Mark Haze, Robin Levetan, Arno Carstens, Saudiq Kahn, Karen Zoid, The Glenn Robertson Jazz Band, Steve Louw and Big Sky, Robin Auld, and Hot Water. One of them will be performing every second Sunday from November 4 until March 17. (See programme schedule below)

The concerts are being held on Sunday afternoons in order to be as accessible as possible for the local community, and ensuring that parents with younger children have the opportunity to attend too. Dog are always welcome.

The Friends of De Waal Park was formed in 2008 by group of volunteers, comprised of individuals who live in the area, to assist the city maintain and improve the park for its citizens. They pay for the pond to be cleaned, for some gardening in the park and for the all important ‘pooh packets’ for the dog walkers! They have repaired benches and arranged for the for the toilet block to remain open after hours. They have upgraded the children’s play area and arranged for additional tables and benches to be placed in the park.

The Summer Concerts will be staged in the original Edwardian bandstand which was manufactured by Messrs Walter McFarlane & Co of Glasgow and presented to ‘the corporation’ in Cape Town by the Traders-Market & Exhibition Ltd. London in 1904. It was moved from the original exhibition space in Green Point to De Waal Park some years later.
‘We are privileged to have an Edwardian bandstand and what is a bandstand for if not for music?’ Said Mike Bosazza, Chairman of FoDWP. ‘We get pleasure by bringing music back into the city bowl for the whole community, and we like to encourage people to use and enjoy our wonderful park.

‘ We are also proud that Cape Town is once again right up-to-date with European trends’ Mike continued ‘As, In the past decade, over a hundred bandstands have been restored in England. Plus October is World Architecture Month so it is the perfect time to celebrate our old structures and buildings.’ he said.

The Summer Concerts, which are free to the public, would not have been possible without the generous support of RE/MAX Living.

Gerlinde Moser of RE/MAX Living says, ‘It’s our way of giving back to the community, after all we don’t just work here, we live here too! It is gratifying for us to see the growing support we are getting from the City Bowl homeowners in response to our neighbourhood support policy. Our agents are proud to be supporters of what will be the largest annual community event in the area.

‘And what better way to say this than with a series of outdoor concerts?’ Music brings joy to everybody, regardless of age, and spending quality time with your family in a beautiful and peaceful park, on a blanket with a picnic, is a wonderful way to spend a Sunday afternoon?’ Gerlinde said.

CONCERT DATES & FEATURED ARTISTS.

November 4th 3pm RUDIMENTALS
November 18th 3pm MARK HAZE

December 2nd 4pm ROBIN LEVETAN
Decembe 16th 4pm JIMMY DLUDLU AND SAUDIQ KAHN (THE MAYOR’S CHRISTMAS CONCERT)

January 6th 4pm KAREN ZOID
January 20th 4pm THE GLENN ROBERTSON JAZZ BAND

February 3rd 4pm STEVE LOUW AND BIG SKY
February 17th 4pm ROBIN AULD

March 3rd 3pm ARNO CARSTENS
March 17th 3pm HOT WATER

For more information visit the De Waal Park website: www.dewaalpark.co.za

Written by Marilyn Thompson and distributed by Marilyn Thompson and Martin Myers

For interviews and photographs contact Martin Myers : 021 4248850,
083 4484475 or martin@triplementertainment.co.za

Rudimentals

Rudimentals

Triple M Entertainment

Triple M Entertainment

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