Gigging since Age 7, Persistence Pays Off for Drummer Lumanyano ‘Unity’ Mzi

At age 7, he snuck out of home, walked from Delft to Phillippe to hear his favourite drummer perform….only to discover that the drummer was not there on that day! Here starts Lumanyano ‘Unity’ Mzi’s first gig, when, at that session, the band invited him to play reggae chops which he knew so well from his father, who headed up the popular reggae Azania Band in Capetown. Mzi showed that he knew the rhythms, but didn’t understand the coaching by the bass player: “You play the kick on one, and the snare on three, which is a rock theme.” Mzi’s musical career had started, and he was having fun!

Lumanyano ‘Unity’ Mzi: courtesy Gregory Franz

Born in 1995, and fifteen years after this first ‘gig’, Mzi thrives daily on his Jazz Performance Diploma studies at UCT’s College of Music as well as moving his UNITY Band from one performance venue to another. UNITY actually started while he was still in High School, with his teen friends who were excited to back visiting bands coming from Johannesburg’s hip hop scene. He held this tight group well, progressing to serve as the resident band at Capetown’s upmarket Taj Hotel main bar on Thursdays.

Delph singer Adelia Dou

Delph singer, Adelia Douw, a teen when she joined the Delph Big Band as the lead vocalist, also joined UNITY. It was then that the Big Band’s director, trumpeter Ian Smith, discovered this Delphite, Mzi, a bit too late to add Mzi to the Big Band. Mzi’s father, an avid Rastafarian, was Mzi’s main influence, taking his son to rehearsals of his band, yet never taught his son how to play the drums. Instead, Mzi sat next to the drummer and watched every move. Mzi would cry when he wasn’t taken to the actual gigs, but determined, he could at least play some songs during rehearsals. Now, as a young adult, he regularly performs at annual reggae festivals, like the Monwabisi Reggae Festival held in Khayelitsha, and has toured in Africa with the All Nations Band to the Gambia, and attended three reggae festivals in the Reunion Islands, one in which his band’s backing vocalist was the late reggae artist Lucky Dube’s daughter. Sponging off from several genres of music during his high school musical years, Mzi has impressively mixed hip hop, gospel, funk, and reggae into his current curry of improvisational drumming, following such notable percussionists as Frank Paco from Mozambique, Brice Wassy from Cameroun, and Paco Siry from Cote d’Ivoire.

Cameroun drummer Brice Wassy

He wants to live up to his name, ‘unity’, and believes in collaboration to bring people and cultures together. “I like to break boundaries, and create bridges to minimize racial tensions around us. We must all work together for the cause of music and social cohesion.” In this vein, Mzi is willing to join social/political causes, such as the Marikana issue, by performing with his band at functions that create awareness and support worthy activism. Another example has been his following with the Spoken Word movement, “Lingua Franca”, initiated with poets and musicians at Capetown’s Baxter Theater to explore how to mutually support their artistry. Amongst all of these exciting projects, Mzi is finishing his University program, and looks forward to performing with UNITY, touring (as a drummer) with the King Kong production which starts again in Capetown next week, and writing his music.

UNITY Band

See the UNITY Band perform at the Masque Theater Foyer Sessions in Muizenberg on 12 November, 2017 at 6.30pm. Band members are: Stephen ‘Stevovo’ de Souza (bass), Thandeka Dladla (vocals), Lonwabo Diba Mafani (piano), Dylan Fine (guitar), Marco Maritz (trumpet), Ofentse Moshwetsi (alto saxophone), and Lilavan Gangen (percussion).

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