Swamp Donkeys kick da Blues! a gig review from Edinburgh

You don’t have to walk much for exercise at this Jazz and Blues Festival – there’s enough knee-jerk, foot-stompin` moves provided by the likes of these groovy Swamp Donkeys who very authentically play classic New Orleans early `jass`.

Young Japanese trombonist, Haruka Kikuchi, and newest member of the live band, settled in NO 1/12 years ago because: “I love the NO style of jazz”! Well, and could this beauty deliver one heck of a raspy bone slide with her new- found love, the Swamp Donkeys Traditional Jass Band. “Not many Asians like to play this type of music,” she explained in her broken English, “but I love it”!  Well, isn’t diversity fun?

There’s nothing mimicking about the Donkeys. It’s as though they arose fresh out of the oil-soaked waters of NO`s Louisiana coastline. They don’t play, they speak, and converse: tuba to banjo, to trumpet, to soprano sax, to that swanky sliding bone, so sassy!  Trumpeter James Williams, who sings a girgly Satchmo very well (even his speaking voice sounds a natural Louis Armstrong), recently performed with DeeDee Bridgewater at Capetown`s international jazz festival last March. I think this youthful band should apply for next year’s 2016 CTIJF, and I told manager Oren Krinsky just that.

Cross-legged Williams wallops an astoundingly convincing rendition of 1920s and 1930s-40s southern American Charlestown-style swing as you imagine your own bones dancing away. The banjo and lady trombone conversed in `My Rosetta`, followed by a drunken drawl as Williams` Armstrong-strained vocals told a sad sad story.

The Donkeys insisted on audience participation as we all staggered about, pretending an early morning inebriation with sound, if not with magical liquids.

But it was the soprano sax that grabbed me with his wails, coos, and hip-smacking swing from someone who resembled a teenage apprentice with lots of musical ancestry of the era. This youthful energy could teach the ole timers a thing or two, it seems.

The Donkeys ended their set with their signature tune, `Swamp Donkeys`, sung by all musos, leaving us hip-smackers smiling all the way to the next exhausting concert.

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Filed under CD & Gig Reviews, Interviews with Carol Martin

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