Rukma Vimana at Alliance Francaise/CapeTown on Friday, 27 February 2015

by Carol Martin

The Alliance Francaise on Loop Street in Cape Town came alive last Friday evening with its special music-backed cuisine offering Brittany crepes and candle-lit tables (no, there was no load-shedding that night, and who needs that for candlelight, anyway??). Thanks to songbird Titilayo Adedokun who helped organize the event, three illustrious jazz musicians were again brought together to announce their profound appreciation for the indigenous sounds of the Cape’s ‘first people’s’. The concert featured notable tastes of the Khoi songs and other improvisational styles of ‘Rukma Vimana’, a trio of multi-instrumentalist Hilton Schilder (mouth and regular piano, mouth bow, and guitar), his cousin double bassist Eldrid Schilder, and youth drummer upstart, Claude Cozens (who last year launched his first eclectic CD scoring points on his own jazz idiom ala ghoema, bebop, gospel, and funk). These Cape Flat musicians carry weight when it comes to producing authentic sounds of the local soil, with rhythms that also get you jumpin’. Titilayo’s series of monthly concerts planned for the future are appropriately called “Jazz Rendez-vous @ Alliance Francaise”. This is a fun way to combine local with French, and indeed, the evening was worth the minimal costs incurred.

Each trio member had a chance to solo, or in a New Orleans dialect, we’d say, “strut your stuff”! All felt comfortable with their own space and sound. They specialize in their own way in these sounds and ghoema rhythms. But it was Hilton who varied the concert repertoire to include his own soft, melodic, and soulful solos which tell stories of their own. The accordion-like mouth piano added a bit of ‘French’ sound to an otherwise local South African song, and the San mouth bow gave its moments. The audience had to listen. And it did with applause. Hilton’s own compositions featured prominently, too. I particularly liked his tribute to Jai Reddy’s rather unusual flying visions and patented products pertaining to planes and insects, in “Flying High”.

Which leads me to understand why the trio is called ‘Rukma Vimana’ – after Reddy’s own aeronautical skills, or rather from an ancient Indian experience of manufacturing a pear-shaped type of aircraft with unusual ducts and fans for airlift….. Well, let’s rest with the other types of fans who will easily lift off as this group replicates the free flying aura of sound-with-soul, combined with emotion and storytelling, of a local type.

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