The Klutz in the Kitchen’s Recipe Blog – MONDAY 13th OCTOBER 2014

Today Yorkshire Pudding Day.

Yorkshire pudding day today2008 saw the launch of British Yorkshire Pudding Day in the U.K. As Sunday Roast Dinners are still the most popular time when people make and eat Yorkshires, it seemed logical that Yorkshire Pudding Day should be on a Sunday, but we thought any day is a good day for a roast and good Yorkshire Pud. It is a recipe which has stood the test of time, a history dating back to the 1700s and its predecessor, Batter Pudding, having been eaten perhaps centuries before that throughout Great Britain. British Yorkshire Pudding Day is not meant to be some sort of serious nationalistic statement with sinister undertones. It is merely a day set aside when everyone, be they British or not, can remember, enjoy and celebrate the joys of an age-old recipe. The Klutz in the Kitchen has found a really easy recipe to be enjoyed on this day, so get the victuals to make a delicious Beef Roast with all the accompanying veggie’s and best of all, Roast Potato’s and Onions. It’s going to be a yummolicious day me thinks J

When is British Yorkshire Pudding Day?

This is a British Holiday and is always the 1st Sunday in February. In America, October 13th is – Yorkshire Pudding Day.

February 2008 marked the launch of British Yorkshire Pudding Day.

As Sunday Roast Dinners are probably still the most popular time when people make and eat Yorkshires, it seemed logical that British Yorkshire Pudding Day should be on a Sunday . . . .

Yummolicious

Yummolicious

Yorkshire Pudding is a recipe which has stood the test of time, a history dating back to the 1700s and its predecessor, Batter Pudding, having been eaten perhaps centuries before that throughout Great Britain.”

British Yorkshire Pudding Day is not meant to be some sort of serious nationalistic statement with  sinister undertones.” “It is merely a day set aside when everyone, be they British or not, can remember, enjoy and celebrate the joys of an age-old recipe.

What is Yorkshire Pudding?

Yorkshire pudding is a dish that originated in Yorkshire but is popular across the whole of the United Kingdom. It is made from batter and most often served with roast beef, chicken, or any meal in which there is gravy, or on its own. Gravy is considered an essential accompaniment by many, and when the pudding is eaten as a starter (see below), onion gravy is usually favoured above other alternatives. It is often claimed that the purpose of the dish was to provide a cheap way to fill the diners – the Yorkshire pudding being much cheaper than the other constituents of the meal – thus stretching a lesser amount of the more expensive ingredients as the Yorkshire pudding was traditionally served first.

Yorkshire pudding is cooked by pouring batter into a preheated greased baking tin containing very hot oil and baking at very high heat until it has risen.

Yorkshire pudding keep calmTraditionally, it is cooked in a large tin underneath a roasting joint of meat in order to catch the dripping fat and then cut appropriately. Yorkshire pudding may also be made in the same pan as the meat, after the meat has been cooked and moved to a serving platter, which also takes advantage of the meat’s fat that is left behind. It is not uncommon to cook them in muffin tins, using 2+ tbs batter per muffin, with 1-2 tsp oil in each tin before preheating pan to very hot. Wrapped tightly, Yorkshire Puddings freeze and reconstitute very well.

Today individual round puddings (baked in bun trays or baking tins like Popovers, or in small skillets) are increasingly prevalent, and can be bought frozen.

The Yorkshire pudding is a staple of the British Sunday dinner and in some cases is eaten as a separate course prior to the main meat dish. This was the traditional method of eating the pudding and is still common in parts of Yorkshire today, having arisen in poorer times to provide a filling portion before the more expensive meat course. “Them ‘at eats t’most pudding gets t’most meat” is the common saying. Because the rich gravy from the roast meat drippings was used up with the first course, the main meat and vegetable course was often served with a parsley or white sauce.

Yorkshire Pudding Recipe

500 to 750ml of milk

6 large tablespoons of flour

3 eggs

1 t-spoon of salt.

Put the flour into a basin with the salt, and stir gradually to this enough milk to make it into a stiff batter. When this is perfectly smooth, and all the lumps are well rubbed down, add the remainder of the milk and the eggs, which should be well beaten. Beat the mixture for a few minutes, and pour it into a shallow tin, which has been previously well rubbed with beef dripping. Put the pudding into the oven, and bake it for an hour; then, for another 1/2 hour, place it under the meat, to catch a little of the gravy that flows from it. Cut the pudding into small square pieces, put them on a hot dish, and serve. If the meat is baked, the pudding may at once be placed under it, resting the former on a small three-cornered stand.

Toad in the Hole

When baked with sausages (within the batter), it is known as toad in the hole. In pub cuisine, Yorkshire puddings may be offered with a multitude of fillings, with the pudding acting as a bowl.

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